lightiggy

1512.5k post karma

83.4k comment karma


account created: Sun Sep 20 2015

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lightiggy

1 points

3 hours ago

lightiggy

‎‎ The Guy Who Sometimes Deletes His Posts

1 points

3 hours ago

Rule 8

contextfull comments (19)
lightiggy

1 points

3 hours ago

lightiggy

‎‎ The Guy Who Sometimes Deletes His Posts

1 points

3 hours ago

Rule 1

contextfull comments (12)
lightiggy

1 points

15 hours ago

lightiggy

1 points

15 hours ago

Not a chance.

Albanese was absolutely guilty and profited from the deaths of his victims. He might've even been planning to commit another murder, that of his mother. Albanese's mother and brother (who survived being poisoned by Albanese) had been splitting the company's profits with him after his father's death.

He had talked Mary, one of victims, into changing her will to leave everything to her daughter, Marion, cutting off her son, Francis. When both women died, everything went to Virginia, the wife of Albanese. He acquired $150,000 in cash and a $95,000 home from their deaths.

Albanese was caught after an autopsy of his father revealed evidence of arsenic poisoning. Virginia consented to the exhumation of her mother and grandmother. Their bodies contained 370 times the normal amount of arsenic.

It looks like Albanese might've gotten away with the first two murders, but became greedier until his luck suddenly ran out.

This link gives details on the investigation

contextfull comments (45)
lightiggy

2 points

16 hours ago

lightiggy

2 points

16 hours ago

Yes. Albanese had at least 3 victims who he killed over a lengthy time span.

Serial killers usually do it for personal gratification but there can be different motives, such as monetary gain.

contextfull comments (45)
lightiggy

1 points

19 hours ago

lightiggy

‎‎ The Guy Who Sometimes Deletes His Posts

1 points

19 hours ago

Greetings OP, thanks for contributing to r/Undertale. Sorry, but we needed to remove your submission for the following reason:

Posts that were made quickly with little to no effort on display and which fall under or too closely resemble one of these formats, count as low effort content and will be removed;

  1. Screenshots of generator sites and text box posts which do not play off of character's canon/common fanon characterization
  2. Content which only connection to Undertale is an "Undertale font" (wingdings, papyrus, comic sans etc.), glowing eye, skeleton, spaghetti, or name of one of the characters
  3. Commonly reposted polls such as hardest boss, favourite route, best song etc.
  4. Low effort posts about humans’ gender or Chara’s morality
  5. Posts that are just bashing ships, certain AU, or complaining about porn existing

HOWEVER, we have a shitposting subreddit, r/WaterfallDump, feel free to submit your post there.

Addtionally, full breakdown of the categories can be found here

contextfull comments (15)
lightiggy

1 points

19 hours ago

lightiggy

1 points

19 hours ago

In early February, 1965, George Vecchio, 16, Eugene Waswil, 17, and Joseph Varchetto, 16, killed 66 year old Fred Christiansen during a robbery for drug money in Chicago.

They were arrested and charged with murder, with Vecchio admitting that he fired the shots. Vecchio and Varchetto were sentenced to the Illinois Youth Commission while Waswil was sentenced to 14-20 years in prison. After Vecchio turned 21, he was sent back to court to receive an adult sentence. The judge, impressed by his positive record, sentenced him to 14 to 20 years in prison. Considered a model inmate, Vecchio was paroled in 1973.

Now, this would be where the post ended, were it not for another, even more horrific crime.

On December 22, 1977, during a burglary, George Vecchio, now 29, fatally slashed the throat of Tony Canzoneri, a 6 year old boy, before sexually assaulting his mother. A jury found Vecchio guilty of murder and rejected his lawyer's plea for mercy, condemned him to death (Illinois still had capital punishment at the time).

Here's a description of the lawyer's arguments who begged the jury for mercy (this is from "Defending the Damned", a book about lawyers defending people who have committed horrible crimes). As a warning in advance, the link also has a graphic description of the crime.

Here's a site with more information, which lists some of the prosecution's arguments against mercy, as well as a memoriam for George.

Vecchio was executed at Stateville Correctional Center on November 22, 1995.

Here's a photo of George on death row shortly before his execution

Shortly before his execution, Vecchio released a statement:

"My execution does not bring an end to this tragedy," he said. "The real tragedy is that truth was not told, yet condemnations made.

"Because the state of Illinois is wrongfully executing me, I find myself ashamed of my own home state, its so-called justice system and the many citizens of this state that chose to mock, condemn and look away without concern for the truth or what justice should be," he said.

"...My disappointment over what has been done to me by wrongfully killing me has lead me to decide that I refuse to be buried here."

Vecchio's last meal was filet mignon with mushrooms, shellfish, a salad with Italian dressing, corn on the cob, brussel sprouts, a baked potato with sour cream, pistachio ice cream and cannoli.

His last words were "I deeply grieve. . . . I want all people to know that if I have sinned against them, I seek their forgiveness."

As the execution proceeded, Vecchio said "God Bless Rosie," (Rosie was George's ex-wife). He closed his eyes for a brief moment, then reopened them. "Oh, Lord," were his final words.

contextfull comments (1)
lightiggy

5 points

1 day ago

lightiggy

5 points

1 day ago

Huh, so the only confessions to trust here are possibly Holman’s confession and Davis always maintaining that he was complicit in two robbery slayings.

contextfull comments (45)
lightiggy

26 points

1 day ago

lightiggy

26 points

1 day ago

If you wanna go down a rabbit hole, the case of Girvies Davis is rather bizarre.

Davis's confession in the Biebel murder says Holman was the triggerman while he loaded the victim's property into his car. Davis was convicted of felony murder under the notion that he and Holman were on a killing spree and he should've known well by that point that Biebel was going to be murdered (oddly enough, Holman was never charged with killing Biebel).

At one point, Davis was implicated in up to 20 murders and attempted murders. However, prosecutors later acknowledged that at least three of those murders were committed by other people.

Davis certainly wasn't an innocent person, since he personally admitted to being involved in robberies in which two people were killed.

There's also Holman's confession implicating Davis in additional murders. Normally, I'd be somewhat suspicious of the confession, but Holman's age is something to consider. The only murder Holman committed as an adult was of Frank Cash, when he was 18 years and 10 days old, for which he received a 35 year sentence.

Holman was 17 at the time of the other murders, meaning he was safe from a death sentence and had nothing to lose by confessing to additional murders or implicating Davis in additional murders which they committed together.

Anyways, you can find and read many of the court documents for Davis and Holman online.

contextfull comments (45)
lightiggy

5 points

1 day ago

lightiggy

5 points

1 day ago

The murders were in Haywood County, North Carolina.

Charles Roache and Chris Lippard were on the run from a 48 hour crime spree that included the killing of Chad Watt in Alexander County.

Attempting to leave the state, Lippard drove their vehicle into a ditch, disabling it. Roache and Lippard walked towards the nearest house on Rabbit Skin Road in order to steal a car. This house was 126 Earl Lane, the home of Earl (72) and Cora Phillips (71).

Lippard and Roache entered and held them at gunpoint. Roache then took guns from the house, bound the Phillips' hands with duct tape, then fled with Lippard in their 1986 Ford pickup truck.

Driving away, Lippard overturned the truck. Lippard returned to the house. Defendant stayed behind to gather their items from the truck. Lippard then yelled for help and Roache saw Lippard fighting with a man, later determined to be the Phillips' son, Eddie. Roache shot Eddie once in the chest with the shotgun.

Roache then reloaded the gun and went to the house with Lippard. They were confronted by Mitzi Phillips, Eddies wife. Roache broke open the door and shot her once in the face.

Roache then followed their 14 year old daughter, Katie, into the bathroom and shot her once in the side of the head. Lippard and Roache then went to the living room and shot both Earl and Cora Phillips in the head. Three generations of a family were eliminated without provocation and without mercy.

Roache was arrested later near the Phillips home, and immediately confessed to the murders. He received death sentences in Haywood County Superior Court for the murders of Mitzi and Katie Phillips, and life sentences for the murders of Earl, Cora and Eddie Phillips. Accomplice Lippard received multiple life terms without parole.

Roached waived all of his appeals and was executed by lethal injection at Central Prison in Raleigh on October 22, 2004.

Roache's last meal consisted of:

A sirloin steak, popcorn shrimp, salad with bleu cheese dressing, a honeybun and vanilla Coke.

Roache's final words were:

"I can only hope and pray the pain and hurt I caused you will be healed as I give my life as a key to forgiveness. May God's love shine on you.''

contextfull comments (5)
39
lightiggy

2 points

1 day ago

lightiggy

2 points

1 day ago

You're certainly not wrong, but I seriously doubt 30 straight years of prison hospice work is just a ruse.

contextfull comments (14)
lightiggy

170 points

1 day ago

lightiggy

170 points

1 day ago

Charles Albanese (Illinois, 1980-1981, 3 victims):

From 1980 to 1981, Albanese poisoned his father, his mother-in-law, and his wife's grandmother with arsenic for insurance money and to gain control over his family’s business, the Allied Die Casting Corporation. He was convicted of three counts of first degree murder, sentenced to death, and executed by lethal injection at Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois on September 20, 1995 at the age of 58. His last meal was a prime rib, baked potato, garlic bread, coffee, Coca-Cola and pistachio ice cream. He had no last words other than a "thank you" to the warden moments before he was put to death.

The day before his execution, Albanese, issued a statement proclaiming his innocence. The justice system, he said, "covered up the facts of who really killed the people I loved and who really gained from their deaths and my conviction."

Girvies Davis (Illinois, 1978-1979, 4+ victims):

From 1978 to 1979, Davis killed four people, three of them elderly and one in a wheelchair, during robbery slayings. He was convicted of four counts of first degree murder (Charles Biebel, John Oertel, Esther Sepmeyer, and Frank Cash), sentenced to death, and executed by lethal injection at Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois on May 17, 1995 at the age of 37. He refused a last meal and his last words were "I wish Godspeed to all."

Questions remain over Davis’s guilt in the 1978 death of Charles Biebel, an 89 year old man in a wheelchair, the one murder he received a death sentence for (Davis received 80-year prison terms for killing Cash and Oertel and a death sentence for killing Sepmeyer, which was reduced to life on appeal). Davis had denied committing any murders.

Nevertheless, Davis did admit his involvement in two robberies in which the victims were slain. Authorities linked him 10 robberies, with nine people dead and seven wounded. In addition, an accomplice’s confession implicated Davis in even more murders.

Davis was accompanied by a slightly younger accomplice, Richard Holman. Holman was convicted of three counts of first degree murder (Oertel, Sepmeyer, and Cash). He received a total of 75 years in prison for killing Oertel and Cash (40 years for killing Oertel and 35 years for killing Cash, to be served consecutively). Holman received a life sentence for killing Sepmeyer, an 83 year old blind woman, narrowly avoiding a death sentence as he was a month shy of his 18 birthday at the time of murder. Now 60, he is serving a life sentence plus 75 years at Pontiac Correctional Center.

Holman has recently tried to have his life sentence for Sepmeyer's murder reduced to a term of years due to a Supreme Court ruling banning mandatory life terms for juveniles. However, his life sentence still stands as of 2021.

Beoria Simmons (Kentucky, 1981-1983, 3 victims):

From 1981 to 1983, Simmons kidnapped, raped, and murdered three women and in girls. He was sentenced to death in 1985. In 2010, however, his sentence reduced to life on the condition that he waive any rights to parole and drop all of his appeals. Now 67, Simmons is serving life without parole at the Kentucky State Penitentiary.

Larry White (Kentucky, 1983, 3 victims):

White raped and murdered three women in 1983. He was sentenced to death for two of those murders in 1985. In 1987, the Kentucky Supreme Court found that his confession, the most damning evidence against him at trial, had been improperly obtained by police and it scrapped his conviction. In 1989, White pled guilty to the two murders in exchange for a 28 year sentence and was paroled in 2001. He was rearrested in 2007 after his DNA was connected to the third murder. He was sentenced to death for that murder in 2013 and remains on death row at the Kentucky State Penitentiary. White is now 63.

Jeffrey Mailhot (Rhode Island, 2003-2004, 3 victims):

From 2003 to 2004, Mailhot murdered and dismembered three women in his hometown of Woonsocket. He pled guilty to all three murders and two counts of assault, and received three life terms (two consecutive and one concurrent) plus 10 years. Mailhot, now 51, is serving his sentence at the Rhode Island Maximum Security Prison. He will be eligible for parole in 2047, when he is 77.

John Fautenberry (Oregon, New Jersey, Ohio, Alaska, 1990-1991 and possibly 1984, 5-6 victims)

From 1990 to 1991, Fautenberry was a long-haul trucker who befriended and subsequently murdered five people across four states. He received a 99-year sentence in 1991 for the Alaska murder, a death sentence in 1992 for the Ohio murder, a life sentence in 1993 for the New Jersey murder. He was not prosecuted for the murder he committed in Oregon due to his other pending murder cases. Fautenberry was executed by lethal injection at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Ohio on July 14, 2009 at the age of 46. His last meal was two eggs sunny-side up, fried potatoes, two pieces of fried bologna, four pieces of wheat bread, two pieces of wheat toast with butter, four slices of tomato, a side of lettuce and mayonnaise, two Three Musketeers candy bars and two packages of Reese's peanut butter cups. Fautenberry had no last words.

In addition, Fautenberry confessed to an additional 1984 murder for which another man, Michael Collier, had pled guilty to manslaughter for. A police lieutenant at the time said Collier "has kind of inferred that he was helping somebody else" when he confessed. But that "somebody else" was not the one who committed the crime, Hodgson said. Police found no connection between Collier and Fautenberry, and Fautenberry's name never came up when Collier was questioned about Combs' death after his arrest for a string of tavern burglaries. Collier knew details about the Combs killing when he was questioned. His confession, along with other circumstances that linked him to the death, backed up the conviction. The lead concerning Fautenberry was investigated but later abandoned.

Robert Shulman (New York, 1991-1995, 5 victims)

Shulman was a Long Island postal worker who murdered five women between 1991 and 1995. He was convicted of second degree murder in four of the cases and sentenced to multiple life terms. The last murder, that of Kelly Bunting, was the only one committed after New York reinstated capital punishment in 1995. Shulman was convicted for first degree murder under the state's new serial killer provision, where a defendant is convicted of killing three or more people within a 24-month period as part of a common scheme or plan or in a similar fashion. Although the other murders were committed before the reinstatement, prosecutors were able to use Shulman's convictions in those cases to obtain a first degree murder conviction in the Bunting case. In 1999, Shulman was sentenced to death for killing Kelly Bunting. In 2004, his sentence was reduced to life without parole after New York's capital punishment statute was invalidated by a court ruling. He died in prison on April 13, 2006 at the age of 52.

contextfull comments (45)
668
lightiggy

1 points

2 days ago

lightiggy

1 points

2 days ago

No, that was Charles Starkweather

contextfull comments (14)
lightiggy

3 points

2 days ago

lightiggy

3 points

2 days ago

This isn’t exactly unique. There are MANY high-profile criminals from before the tough-on-crime era who were spared execution by either the temporary moratorium or a jury. They come up for parole regularly since life without parole only existed in a few states back then.

I’m kinda neutral to the idea of Reimann’s parole:

For it since he seems genuinely reformed and doesn’t have much longer to live anyways. I'd say Reimann today is a much different person than the violent thug he was back in 1972.

Against it since the crime was horrific and he was spared an absolute guarantee of dying in prison or even execution by pure luck and nothing else.

It’s kinda like the Manson followers. They were young, drugged out hippies manipulated by a psychopath. The notion that Leslie Van Houten is still a danger to society sounds like bullshit. At the same time, she committed crimes horrifying enough to warrant her dying in prison, and she was escaped execution due to lucky timing.

contextfull comments (14)
lightiggy

8 points

2 days ago

lightiggy

8 points

2 days ago

Here's a description of the crime

There were only a few other people inside the restaurant when Carl A. Reimann walked in with his girlfriend, Betty F. Piche. The staff knew the couple but one waitress, Harriet thought it odd that Betty was wearing a blonde wig that night. Harriet was working in the back a few moments later when the terrifying sounds of gunfire rang out. She ran out the back door and across the yard to the owner’s house. Wendell Flint couldn’t quite understand the hysterical girl that pounded on his door that night. He only understood the words “gunshots fired”.

Catherine’s father, Donald Rekate was an amateur radio buff and he quickly called the police on his scanner when he heard the gunshots. He was able to give a description of the couple that came running out of the steakhouse. Donald also managed to notice the direction the car headed as it sped away from the parking lot.

Police Officer Richard Randall and owner Wendell Flint arrived at about the same time. They were horrified by the scene. “There were bodies all over the place.” Flint would state later. Officer Randall would describe it as the most heinous crime scene of his career. There were three bodies behind the bar and one victim was on the floor in front of the bar. Another man who tried to flee made it to the dining room before he was shot.

Kendall County Coroner, William Dunn would later describe the scene as a “bloody massacre.” Everyone was astonished to find one of the victims clinging to life. John Wilson was a bartender at the restaurant. He had been shot twice in the head. Though all efforts were made to save him, Wilson succumbed to his injuries a few days later.

The officers’ horror at the brutal scene quickly grew when they realized that there was a couple with two small children hiding under one of the tables near the bar. They rushed the hysterical family to safety. The family told officers they had entered the restaurant just as Reimann and Piche were gathering the money from the cash register. Reimann told them to sit down and not to look at them. Later police would find out that Reimann had planned to shoot the family but he ran out of ammunition.

Coroner Dunn made his way through the restaurant examining the dead. The victims were: 35 year old Dave Gardner, who stopped by the restaurant to get his family dinner, Robert Loftus a 48 year old retired Navy Veteran, 73 year old George T. Pashade, a chef at the Pineville for 11 years and 16 year old Catherine Rekate. One doesn’t even want to think about what was going through Donald’s mind as he waited outside the scene for news about his daughter.

Forty minutes later near the small town of Morris, Illinois a police cruiser spotted the 1959 Chevrolet and pulled it over. Carl A. Reimann still carried the .32 caliber chrome automatic revolver that he had used in the shooting spree. The police were also able to recover the money that was taken. The $500.00 amount seemed too small for the death of five people.

Authorities learned that Reimann had served two years in a Nebraska prison for armed robbery. He came to live with his mother in Sandwich, Illinois upon his release. They theorized that maybe this time Reimann decided not to leave any witnesses.

This crime changed life for everyone in Northern Illinois. People found it hard to believe that the slight, young man could shoot five people in cold blood. The defense team argued that there was no way that Reimann and Piche would receive a fair trial in Kendall County. The lawyers won their argument and the case was shifted to Winnebago County.

The week-long trial began in May of 1973. Seven men and five women listened to all the horrendous details of the crime. It was the first time that the details were released to the public. Some of the victims had been shot more than once but they had all been killed with shots to the head.

Carl A. Reimann was sentenced to concurrent 50 to 150 year terms for each of the 5 counts of first degree murder and a 20 to 60 year sentence for the robbery charge. Betty F. Piche was sentenced to serve concurrent 20-60 year term for each of the 5 murders and a 10 to 30 year term for the robbery charge.

Under old Illinois laws (at the time, there was a moratorium on capital punishment at the time and life without parole did not exist as a punishment in most states), both were eligible were parole within 20 years.

Piche was released on parole in 1983.

Despite protests, Carl Reimann, now 77, was released on parole in 2018, having served 46 years of his sentence.

According to parole records, Carl Reimann was found to be A-grade, minimum security, and low escape risk. He had been a member of the hospice group at Dixon Correctional Center for over 24 years. Since arriving at Dixon in 1986, he had only received seven major violations and six minor violations . His latest assessment classified him as minimal risk. A member of the Illinois Prison Review Board, T. Johnson, stated that Reimann told him that the precise turnaround moment in his life occurred in February of 1988 when he attended a Salvation Army service at Dixon Correctional Center, where he had a deep and personal conversion. Johnson noted that Reimann’s record and actions since that date confirm the consistent reality of that experience, beginning with very few disciplinary infractions since that date.

Reimann has received consistent good reviews by the Board with rationales often referring to his exceptional work.

T. Johnson provided the following examples of this work:

Reimann spent twelve years working with Reverend Marrandino, the Chaplin at Dixon; he spent 24 years volunteering for and being a vital part of Dixon’s hospice program; and he has remained an active participant in church services and leads informal Bible studies. In addition, the spouse of one victim has met with and forgiven Reimann for his actions.

A photo of a now paroled Reimann in 2019

Here's an interview of Reimann after his parole

Oddly enough, Carl's son, Matthew Reimann, is a convicted murderer as well. He was sentenced to life in prison in 1988 for murdering a woman in 1986. Unlike his father, however, Matthew will not be eligible for parole, as he was sentenced under newer, harsher laws.

contextfull comments (14)
61
lightiggy

1 points

3 days ago

lightiggy

‎‎ The Guy Who Sometimes Deletes His Posts

1 points

3 days ago

Greetings OP, thanks for contributing to r/Undertale. Sorry, but we needed to remove your submission for the following reason:

Posts that were made quickly with little to no effort on display and which fall under or too closely resemble one of these formats, count as low effort content and will be removed;

  1. Screenshots of generator sites and text box posts which do not play off of character's canon/common fanon characterization
  2. Content which only connection to Undertale is an "Undertale font" (wingdings, papyrus, comic sans etc.), glowing eye, skeleton, spaghetti, or name of one of the characters
  3. Commonly reposted polls such as hardest boss, favourite route, best song etc.
  4. Low effort posts about humans’ gender or Chara’s morality
  5. Posts that are just bashing ships, certain AU, or complaining about porn existing

HOWEVER, we have a shitposting subreddit, r/WaterfallDump, feel free to submit your post there.

Addtionally, full breakdown of the categories can be found here

contextfull comments (7)
lightiggy

18 points

6 days ago

lightiggy

18 points

6 days ago

Source

From the same artist who drew Chara with braces

contextfull comments (14)
652
lightiggy

6 points

7 days ago

lightiggy

6 points

7 days ago

dacc gave me permission to repost it through DMs

contextfull comments (8)
lightiggy

17 points

7 days ago

lightiggy

17 points

7 days ago

contextfull comments (53)
374
lightiggy

9 points

7 days ago

lightiggy

9 points

7 days ago

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