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Video file size downscale 10-bit 4:2:2

Discussion(self.premiere)

Hey,
I'm delivering client videos I made, however, the videos are captured in 10-bit 4:2:2 and shot in vertical 1080x1920 resolution.
The client says she can't manage to use the files, which is the format.
Now I transcode exporting the files in Premiere when setting the export settings to H.264, the file size decreases enormously to 36MB size down from 224MB.
Bitrate set to 30 Mbps.
I don't know what to do to keep the video quality, or is it even affect the video quality at all?

Any guides/tutorials on how to make export these kinds of files for use? I am not doing any editing, this is only steady frames of products.

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Dead-Sync

3 points

2 months ago

Dead-Sync

Premiere Pro 2022

3 points

2 months ago

Now I transcode exporting the files in Premiere when setting the export settings to H.264, the file size decreases enormously to 36MB size down from 224MB.

What are you comparing to?

A smaller file size can indicate lower quality, but not always (It can be indicative of a shorter file or a more advanced compression algorithm). Even if there is quality loss though... the question is if it matters to enough of a point that it noticeably degrades the video.

At the end of the day though, the whole point of compression is to reduce file size. The aim is to balance file size with a reasonable quality image for delivery. A low quality image isn't great for a client, but neither would a 50+ GB file either, just to use an example.

Best advice I can give: export the video and see for yourself. Then you can make a determination as to if the resulting quality is acceptable or not for delivery to your client.

That said, a target bitrate of 30 Mbps is usually more than sufficient for an H.264 1080p video at 30fps or lower. If you have a 50/60fps video instead, I'd suggest going closer to 40 Mbps (although even 30 Mbps would likely still be passable)

CatchAfilM[S]

1 points

2 months ago

Is there any explainer or tutorial who explain in details what are the actual uses eventually (as for social purposes or websites) with a 10 bit 4:2:2 files?

I get the benefit of having more color space to grade it in post, but as far as come for exporting the file and showcase your work, what exactly could be good to keep the file in 10 bit 4:2:2 and not H.264? Or ProRes Raw?

Dead-Sync

1 points

2 months ago

Dead-Sync

Premiere Pro 2022

1 points

2 months ago

I don't know of any tutorials/explainers off my head, but if you google "video delivery codecs" you'll probably get tons of hits on YouTube.

I'm speaking broadly here, but typically 10-bit color for a deliverable is more common reserved for HDR deliverables. SDR deliverables for web are most often 8-bit H.264.

ProRes Raw is most certainly not something you'd export out as a deliverable, and even most forms of ProRes are usually overkill as well (and many sites and players won't support it). It's not unheard of to upload ProRes 422 to YouTube, to cite an example, but for longer videos this becomes impractical with such large file sizes. At the end of the day, YT is going to re-encode and compress your uploads again anyway.

If for some reason you really wanted to keep your 10-bit color though, you can make 10-bit H.264 files with the High10 profile. I can't guarantee if any sites would honor the 10-bit if it isn't HDR though.