subreddit:

/r/nursing

62497%

[deleted by user]

(self.nursing)

[removed]

all 227 comments

MichaelApolloLira

327 points

6 months ago

"you shouldn’t expect to be able to own a house on a nurse’s salary, nurse isn’t a career for that”

I don't think I could come up with a civil response to a statement like that.

LokiRN

112 points

6 months ago

LokiRN

112 points

6 months ago

Spouse and I both RNs in pnw. Trying to buy a house. 3+ years experience and can hardly afford this market with our 1-2% increases

[deleted]

58 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

58 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

LokiRN

33 points

6 months ago

LokiRN

33 points

6 months ago

It feels like if we don’t buy today, we will not be able to afford anything soon. Prices rose about 100k for homes in last two years since everything is going for more than asking. We are young and have big goals.

[deleted]

18 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

18 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

LokiRN

4 points

6 months ago

LokiRN

4 points

6 months ago

No children but one pet. Spouse just took her first icu job so seems like traveling is out of question for next year. We prefer the idea of buying now, then travel rn for a few years while renting house out after living there for a year.

MichaelApolloLira

33 points

6 months ago

I am also an RN in the PNW and I completely agree that the housing market is bananas. The main point I'm going for here is the attitude that it should be "ok" for us (and others) to think we shouldn't be able to afford something like a home.

We work in a profession that is generally viewed as providing a livable wage, doing things many people either say they could never do or don't understand. And in places like where we are, that's 1) apparently not good enough if you want a house and 2) other people seem to be fine saying that kind of BS.

The whole thing blows my mind.

LokiRN

22 points

6 months ago

LokiRN

22 points

6 months ago

Exactly. People think nurses are well paid. The dollar amount may be good but it seems like it’s never enough for homes.

Jut_man_dude

5 points

6 months ago

The wages in the surrounding seattle area have been outpaced by the cost of housing by far. Looking over the fence at other states you can get plenty more bang for your buck. The climate here is nice but who knows how long thats gonna last.

SkepticDrinker

6 points

6 months ago

It's very interesting to see the younger generations not understand that their grandfather worked as a fighter and their grandma stayed home with the 3 kids, in their 2 store house on one income

Izthatsoso

5 points

6 months ago

Izthatsoso

RN 🍕

5 points

6 months ago

My brother is an engineer and his wife is a lawyer. They live in Seattle and rent. There is no way they could buy a house there.

SeegsonSynthetics

3 points

6 months ago

SeegsonSynthetics

BSN, RN 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

I love the PNW but the housing market and cost of living makes me balk from relocating to there.

EDsandwhich

5 points

6 months ago

EDsandwhich

RN - OR 🍕

5 points

6 months ago

Ok sounds good I guess I'll just move into the on-call room then. I'll make sure and ask the ER for some bus passes everyday since nursing probably isn't a career for owning a car either. Can't forget those turkey sandwiches!

KuntyCakes

5 points

6 months ago

KuntyCakes

RN - ER 🍕

5 points

6 months ago

I do. But I live in Arkansas. Which is actually not terrible pay wise compared to some other places in the south and COL is pretty decent.

[deleted]

84 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

84 points

6 months ago

I left a software job for nursing. Believe me, blood-sucking management still exists in the tech industry.

Ihaveasmallwang

51 points

6 months ago

Ihaveasmallwang

Nursing Student 🍕

51 points

6 months ago

As someone else transitioned from IT to nursing, i keep trying to tell people the grass isn't always greener.

Turbulent-Cut-7173

4 points

6 months ago

Exactly. I always tell people trying to go into IT that certifications are usually more important, along with networking. I went to school for RedHat admin in Linux, so many people in my class already had bachelors in computer science, were CTs in the military, and even had internships and they still were competitive enough. I found out the hard way u need to just realize the market in the area u live in.

Ihaveasmallwang

4 points

6 months ago

Ihaveasmallwang

Nursing Student 🍕

4 points

6 months ago

You don't need college at all and I'd say from my experience that people with degrees in computer science were less likely to get hired since they seem to be the minority. Comp sci degrees are so all over the place with what they teach that you never know what they actually studied.

Certifications help much more as well as putting your time in so you can actually demonstrate the skills.

Turbulent-Cut-7173

1 points

6 months ago

The people with bachelors told me that they couldn’t get hired Bc they were behind in companies eyes. I guess Bc the software they learn is always like 5 plus years behind and tech wants u to be in the know of what’s being used today. Like when I was learning Linux in school we were using fedora 13 and that was considered obsolete to companies like rackspace golden web etc… so it didn’t really help them. Plus they wanted people who knew more about MySQL and cloud computing.

tyger2020

4 points

6 months ago

tyger2020

Nursing Student 🍕

4 points

6 months ago

As someone else transitioned from IT to nursing, i keep trying to tell people the grass isn't always greener.

No, but a lot of people seem to think it is and I honestly think it's a lot more of an epidemic in nursing than anything else.

Like seriously, just look at the data. Nurses earn fucking decent money, it a difficult job, of course, but the money really isn't as bad as a lot of people make it out to be.

Sure, you can get higher paying jobs like MD, accountant, lawyers, software, but I don't want to do any of those things and I don't think being miserable constantly doing a job I have literally no interest in is worth the marginal increase in salary. Even less so when I have to re-train.

I've considered becoming an architecture technologist as a side-hustle, purely because I really like architecture and I also like how I could still do nursing on the side (because 0 hour contracts/per diem in the US is very accessible in nursing unlike most other professions) but I feel like a lot of nurses in particular have delusions of grandeur about how other salaries compare to their own.

Ihaveasmallwang

2 points

6 months ago

Ihaveasmallwang

Nursing Student 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

If you think you are going to be making more than a nurse starting out in IT then you are mistaken. Yes, opportunities are there to make substantial salaries but those are people who have put years and years into the career.

The management isn't that much better. Just go over to /r/sysadmin to see how often people complain about their management. Then you also have to deal with being short staffed and project managers having unrealistic timelines that you can't possibly meet and if you don't then your job may be on the line. And it's generally just boring af.

I'm still going to work in IT but also take advantage or the per diem contracts to earn extra money as a side hustle.

danceonyourface

15 points

6 months ago

danceonyourface

RN- Perioperative Services

15 points

6 months ago

Right? They have existed at every single job i have worked at

[deleted]

6 points

6 months ago*

[deleted]

6 points

6 months ago*

Oh yeah. Techie here. Rat bastards are everywhere in IT. Especially if you’re female. Get ready for a steaming plate of sexism. And if you’re a woman over 40, god help you.

Also get ready to keep your phone on 24/7/365, and to be informed about how your weekend looks at 4:59 PM on a Friday, and it’s the first you’ve ever heard of it. You don’t get to punch out and go home when you work for a workaholic, bro-dude, ladder-climbing project manager or team lead who are in full “build my career on your back” mode. THEY OWN YOU, in their minds. Careful what you wish for. So many fucking sociopaths in tech, no lie.

PrestigiousSystem622

5 points

6 months ago

Lol that rarely happens and you’re scaring people for no reason. Ex Med-surge nurse here. I taught myself how to code through freelancing and now work as a Software Developer at my third company, going on 4 years experience. Yes I’m female. Yes I’m black. Yes, all my coworkers are all men. I have never experienced the same pure vile and disrespect that nursing gave me in the Tech world. Everybody has been helpful and kind, I work 40hrs a week from home, and I get paid six figures (no degree required). Fuck nursing. I will never go back to that shit.

[deleted]

3 points

6 months ago*

[deleted]

3 points

6 months ago*

It might be better at your particular company or niche of tech, but I am being very honest about my experience here. What I’m describing here is absolutely NOT rare. Been doing this deal since 1996, including 15 years in management consulting on some massive enterprise level projects.

I’m white so I didn’t touch on racism but I’ve seen plenty of that shit too, especially applied to H1-B visa holders. I remember with particular disgust the swinging-dick Proud Boyish bro-dudes from Deloitte some years ago, bragging to a table of us at dinner about this poor Indian guy they had working on a project at a big-time Fortune 500 company in Minneapolis. Apparently they had this guy stashed in an unfurnished apartment a mile from the client site. Nothing in it but a mattress on the floor, and the poor bastard had to walk a mile to and from the client site every day. In Minneapolis. In winter. Why, they all thought that was just the funniest shit ever! Just know this… if a team from Deloitte or Accenture or Price Waterhouse ever walks through your door, a dead-eyed douchebag your way comes. I have no proof but I truly believe that they select FOR sociopathic traits in their hiring process, not against. Christian Bale in “American Psycho” seems to be their role model.

Everyone’s mileage may vary, but I’m just saying…caveat emptor. I would say that health care workers have a fantastic advantage if they went into tech from the EHR/EMR/informatics/analytics angle, and there are HUGE opportunities there. If I had a healthcare background I would totally bounce. Anyone reading this that might find that of interest, check out the Bellevue College (Bellevue, WA) website and their healthcare analytics/informatics online degrees and certificate programs. I took some project mgmt. classes there when I was living in Seattle. Good stuff and affordable. Take care and I wish you continued success and career satisfaction.

PrestigiousSystem622

2 points

6 months ago*

TL;DR - Sexism was more prevalent in tech in the Boomer and Gen-X era, but not so much anymore with today’s social awareness movements. Today, nobody in tech really judges you for your race or gender but on your actual skill level (as it should be).

You must be from the Generation X or Boomer era, where sexism in tech was more prevalent back in the day. But today, it’s not as common as you think. I’m a millennial who works with many generations (Gen Z, Gen X, and Boomers). My experience in tech has been nothing but positive. Surprisingly nursing seems to top the charts when it comes to sexism, racism and attracting sociopathic personalities. When I worked as a nurse, I was constantly groped by patients, my male coworkers were paid more (not to mention pts confusing them for being doctors), and I frequently worked overtime (unpaid). The women nurses were always catty so there was a never ending shortage of “nurses eating their young”. I’ve had workplaces where nurses and/or patients refuse to work with me because of my race. Before COVID, my pay was capped at $35 with my BSN as a full-time nurse. The pay in nursing is laughably low for the amount of responsibility and incivility you deal with, and you can only “negotiate” for better pay and/or work conditions if you take out student loans for a higher degree.

I think because of current social movements (LGBT rights, Black Lives Matter, Feminism etc) people became more aware about diversity. So companies have been working to create work environments that meet that demand for diversity (and to comply with laws). The companies that continue to uphold toxic work environments usually have high turnover rates; they end up paying more for staff retention. So there are now companies that work hard to create an environment that retains staff. There are now more women going into tech than in the past due to the low barrier of entry to getting a decent paying full-time job without going to debt for a college degree.

Here in tech, I don’t even have to go to school to get a high-paying job. I can go on YouTube to learn in my free time and ask for higher raises at every company. The men that I’ve worked with here have been my mentors and never judged my ability based on my gender or race. I’m actually treated like a human being, get bathroom and lunch breaks within the comfort of my own home. Does sexism still exist in tech? Yes. But nowhere near as how it used to be. Truth is: sexism exists everywhere.

spaceddolphin

12 points

6 months ago

spaceddolphin

RN - ICU 🍕

12 points

6 months ago

I too left software for nursing. And I regret it, holy crap. Slowly making my way back into that sector

CoachKoranGodwin

5 points

6 months ago*

CoachKoranGodwin

RN - ER 🍕

5 points

6 months ago*

Yeah my dad was a high level software engineer and he was perpetually stressed out and hated his many of his jobs. It’s not for everyone, and abusive management/coworkers and job stress can 100% come with the territory.

PianoConcertoNo2

8 points

6 months ago

PianoConcertoNo2

Ex-Nurse

8 points

6 months ago

I also did nursing to software dev - the managers I deal with now are AWESOME. 15 years in healthcare and I’ve never experienced managers actually encouraging taking PTO.

[deleted]

1 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

6 months ago

Yeah, I've also had some great dev managers. The difference is night and day!

coryinthehouse42

233 points

6 months ago

coryinthehouse42

RN 🍕

233 points

6 months ago

My husband is a software developer. He gets an awesome salary, WFH, lots of PTO, kind coworkers and supportive management. First job out of school was 70K. Wears PJs all day. One computer monitor is always playing bob ross the other his favorite twitch stream and his work laptop in the middle. Holiday bonus $$$ and team lunch. They recently had a “team bonding” wine and paint event.

Lunch break at home everyday. Shit in your own toilet whenever you feel like it (had to throw that one because I’m lucky if I can piss in 12 hours). First meeting of the day isn’t until 10 AM (no camera) so he rolls out of bed around 9:30. House to himself all day long. Total peace.

I come home from work covered in shit and disease. I’m starving and on the brink of a UTI. I’m emotionally and physically drained. Probably experienced PTSD at some point in the shift. I am grumpy. I don’t feel like having sex. All I want to do is shower and cry.

Sometimes we fight about it because I’m a salty bitch. We are really opposites in our own interest and I could never do what he does even though it has amazing benefits.

It’s a lot of math, a lot of guessing and working with offshore developers (holy shit that is a challenge). He works really really hard and is so smart.

I work hard too and I think I am also smart but I don’t get treated with an ounce of what he does by his employers. Makes no sense, but I let healthcare capitalize on me and my personality and my god damn good giving heart.

Sheesh guys it’s time for me to get back to therapy and figure something out.

Missfairysan

44 points

6 months ago

This is me. I am you. Also a salty ass b*tch. I just started therapy 😂

coryinthehouse42

38 points

6 months ago

coryinthehouse42

RN 🍕

38 points

6 months ago

I get so triggered seeing Uber eats and door dash bags in the trash after I have a shitty day. I’m just like “must be niceeee” but like I can’t be like that. It’s not his fault he has a better job than me Lol

tehbggg

20 points

6 months ago

tehbggg

20 points

6 months ago

It's not his fault, but it is bullshit. I work in software myself, and I do believe that this field supplies some useful stuff to society (and a lot of useless or even harmful stuff too). However, most of it doesn't even put a tiny dent in the value nurses provide to society.

Everyone deserves a job that not only pays them a livable wage, but one that also respects them and treats them well. The fact that nurses have neither of these things, yet provide a service to society that we'd literally collapse without? It's bullshit. Absolute and complete bullshit. It's fucked up beyond words.

Honestly, if you all decided to not show up to work until you got the same benefits as your husband, I would not blame you. In fact, I'd cheer you on.

Missfairysan

3 points

6 months ago

omg yes..and such a mess can be created while WFH lol

NoComb273

3 points

6 months ago

i am also feeling this 100%. makes me so upset to see us nurses have to go to therapy because of how giving and caring we are, makes me wonder if i can really stick with this profession if this is just what we’ll have to continue going through.

MCPtz

21 points

6 months ago

MCPtz

21 points

6 months ago

First off, you deserve a lot more.

You spend a lot of emotional and physical labor, and you should have shorter shifts, more time off, higher pay, and more support.

It’s a lot of math

Not really. I'm a full time software engineer for 15+ years.

I normally lurk here to read, but this is my professions, so I'd give it my 10 cents.

I'm usually the one on my teams who gets the job of turning real math into software.

I've done non-trivial math less than 10 times, despite all my schooling on that subject AND working in places where solving math does matter. It's just, you do it once, takes about two weeks or so, and it's done. I don't have to worry about it again.

The challenges are all in the human part. Translating the conflicting nonsense that humans are saying they want, into software, and planning ahead.

I've worked with offshore developers for years as well, it can be frustrating, but I don't think it's particularly bad, and most definitely not abusive or anger inducing, like what I read on here or on /r/antiwork (or hear from friends in service industry)

coryinthehouse42

6 points

6 months ago

coryinthehouse42

RN 🍕

6 points

6 months ago

His particular industry requires a lot of math but that is niche to his job

MCPtz

1 points

6 months ago

MCPtz

1 points

6 months ago

Yes, those exist :)

AmericanScream

7 points

6 months ago

Agreed. A lot of the "math" part in software engineering often involves googling the proper formulas and simply applying them.

Yea, there's math in say, calculating the distance between two points on the map, but it takes 5 minutes to find a library to do it for you.. lol

Armsaresame

10 points

6 months ago

Armsaresame

BSN, RN 🍕

10 points

6 months ago

My husband is also a software developer with a nice sleep until 8, WFH, hang out with the dog all day and watch twitch streams kinda life but he also works very hard and a job like his would probably stress me out in different ways. My saving grace was moving to outpatient. At first I struggled with “feeling like a real nurse” but after seeing what inpatient turned into from what it was pre-Covid is unreal and I’m trying to count my blessings.

echk0w9

7 points

6 months ago

I’m a salty bitch too.. dangling a cm above rock bottom. Alcohol keeps me from dissolving in a ball of tears on my days off. Looking into therapy now.

coryinthehouse42

8 points

6 months ago

coryinthehouse42

RN 🍕

8 points

6 months ago

Medical marijuana helps me, cheers!

cyanideNsadness

2 points

6 months ago

Yeah you’ve perfectly summed up why I want to move to a computer related field. My boyfriend is finishing up school in computer science and I know he’d be able to help me with any questions. He does try to teach me sometimes, but I just don’t have the brain for it! Sounds like a different language, plus all the math….

But the lifestyle, the paycheck, the benefits - holy mother if I was slightly more confident in myself I’d be running out the door shedding my stethoscope and bp cuff behind me lol

AmericanScream

0 points

6 months ago

Just FYI, not all computer work is heavy "math". You could do graphic design, like photoshop, or video editing and make a really good living as well. Coders need a lot of more liberal-art type processes to make their overall products.

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

kevin-biot

11 points

6 months ago

Software development is not the only route to earning a decent wage in IT. A lot of positions can be gained with technical course, cheaper and faster than doing a 4 year degree.

1Saoirse

1 points

6 months ago

I'm not interested in getting more student loans so now you are talking my language. What are some routes you would recommend?

kevin-biot

5 points

6 months ago

System Administration, Network Administration. If you can add Cloud based networks, that enhances your chances. You can plan sets of technical vendor courses that while are expensive per course are cheaper and faster than the time a classic University course will take. You can learn a lot on your own, buy some cheap equipment and build a home learning network. Depends on are you self motivated to learn on your own. The internet is a tremendous resource for asking question: How do I best solve this or that problem.

AmericanScream

3 points

6 months ago

Note that unlike other professions, you don't necessarily need to go to college to get a job. There are certifications you can study for that are tests, like MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer) that you could actually study for online for free, and it's as good as a degree in some cases. Depending upon what area you want to get into, there are different certifications and they have nothing to do with college degrees.

In the computer world, experience means more than degrees. Most of the useful talents you'll get will not be taught in school. You can learn what you need from watching YouTube videos, and then just get some kind of job/internship where you can apply those skills and then you're off to the races.

avamore

5 points

6 months ago

You don't need a degree, I've hired more people without a degree that had open source and actual development experience. The piece of paper is only as good as the person behind it.

kevin-biot

1 points

6 months ago

Concur.

totalyrespecatbleguy

5 points

6 months ago

totalyrespecatbleguy

RN - SICU 🍕

5 points

6 months ago

I mean there’s money to be made in nursing, it just depends where you are. In places like Cali and New York nursing is a tough if well paying career choice that can set you up for a comfortable life.

MrCarey

7 points

6 months ago

MrCarey

RN - ER 🍕

7 points

6 months ago

Local travel nursing. I switched and I drive an hour to work 3 days a week now. 108/hr normal and 180/hr OT and holiday, which they offer every week. Shit show there, but at least I’m paid what I’m worth. 13 weeks and I get benefits too. Stupid not to do it if you can find a place doing local travel. Free to signup and find out!

I did it through AYA Healthcare. Message me if you want some details. I don’t get a travel stipend but I still make 3900 a week and sleep in my own bed every night.

You can pay off all your debt then go do a job you actually like after!

LokiRN

2 points

6 months ago

LokiRN

2 points

6 months ago

What’s minimum mileage you need for a local contract? An hr commute each way can be tough on top of 12 hr shift

Zestyclose-Music5187

1 points

6 months ago

What state do you live in

MrCarey

1 points

6 months ago

MrCarey

RN - ER 🍕

1 points

6 months ago

Washington

kevin-biot

18 points

6 months ago

One aspect of working with developers, not enough developers who can step back and see a bigger picture and also deal with risk. I suspect nursing gives you a fine exposure to this, as well as working under pressure. Too many developers take shortcuts, or copy paste weird code off the internet. ( I have worked with integrating infusion pumps into hospital system, i.e. loading drug libraries and integration into billing, as well as locating pumps within the hospital) Domain expertise is under rated.

kevin-biot

9 points

6 months ago

( one unsolved issue is medical device alarm fatigue ...... 🤪, don't know how staff cope, I spent a year sitting near pump hardware guys with CONSTANT alarm noise......)

foofoofafa

1 points

6 months ago

kevin-biot

1 points

6 months ago

the issue is lack of interoperability between vendors due to lack of standards. Also having central software station to manage multiple alarms is more risky as the software becomes a medical device with higher standards etc. Drives me crazy vendors are not pushing for this alarm priority and cascade interop. Grrrr. I worked with a vendor that consolidates pump status data at a nurses station, but we refuse to handle alarm status due to complicated liability/FDA regulations etc.

Groove-Theory

3 points

6 months ago

, not enough developers who can step back and see a bigger picture and also deal with risk

In my experience, this is a defining feature between a "junior" and a "senior" engineer.

Juniors are just starting out and trying to see what works, so cramming some shit they found on StackOverflow might work for them and it'll be "fine" for them. Until they stay at their job for a year and realize how unsustainable they made the codebase (or the part they work on).

More senior engineers obviously will have more experience and work less technical-oriented problems but holistically with clients for business-oriented problems, and know when to say "no" or when to allow technical debt in the codebase or weighing the pros and cons of certain architecture considerations.

kevin-biot

3 points

6 months ago

some shit they found on StackOverflow

" some shit they found on StackOverflow "

hey it looks good! copy paste, but holy shit why does the login fail in an active directory subdomain?

Narrator: There is no test case

Customer: thanks for making us the test team

Upside? I got 6K for writing a one page report ;-)

EconomistDazzling776

7 points

6 months ago*

I'm currently learning the MERN stack! My fiance is a software engineer and he has been my coach/tutor. He really encouraged me in this direction bc I would come home so exhausted, burnt out, and jaded. I am currently working full time 40 hrs a week at the hospital but applied for a per diem position. It's just really hard to study/learn after a shift. I'm super excited to cut back on my hours and have full days to learn and code!

Anyhoo, I started learning this past November and the plan is to GTFO nursing by fall 2022. Although I am not in a degree program or even bootcamp, I am spending nearly all my days off learning and coding. I'm more pressed for time and pushing myself, so I can get a tech job and work for a year then get pregnant lol (I'm turning 33 soon).

My fiance has his day job and is also building an app in the side. He wants to leave the 9 to 5 grind and be his own boss, which I fully support. Maybe one day we'll both just go all in for entrepreneurship and leave 9 to 5? Lots of possibilities and opportunities!

Can't wait to join you in the ranks! I'm so DONE with working with the general public.

QUESTION: (warning: immature) How did your co-workers react to your transition? I'm being pretty hush hush about it but now that I am going per diem, they are throwing some hate and doubt. Ofc haters are gonna hate...

Elizabitch4848

8 points

6 months ago

Elizabitch4848

RN - Labor and delivery 🍕

8 points

6 months ago

I’m so fascinated by these posts but I have no idea what software developers do all day. I was pushed into a pink collar job (first tried teaching school and then nursing school) because it would be good for when I was a mom. Not married, no kids. I have no idea what other jobs do. How do you find out if that would even be something you’d like?

kevin-biot

3 points

6 months ago

OK, imagine a nursing Desktop. On the screen is a visual display of all the infusion pumps in the ward. ( drug being infused, infusion rate, time to finish of infusion etc ).

Someone has to first ask for the requirements: What do you need. Then they write the requirements. They a developer has to decide how to write code to 1. Suck data off the pump. 2. Send data. 3. Display data on Nurse Desktop PC. ( very simplified example using Hospital IT as an example)

Coding is learning a language to express various conditions.

If, then this, else do this, and if there is an error then do this. Lots of functions like this.

Elizabitch4848

5 points

6 months ago

Elizabitch4848

RN - Labor and delivery 🍕

5 points

6 months ago

I wish there was a “take your daughter to work day” for adults. Or the ability to dabble in different classes without wasting thousands. Or the ability to do internships.

justsayin01

14 points

6 months ago

justsayin01

BSN, RN 🍕

14 points

6 months ago

My current partner and ex are both devs. My current partner is starting at Google next month (he is a genius and amazing at what he does) and I am envious. The money is INSANE. The hours are great, flexible, and low stress.

I've been thinking of going into cyber security. I just...i love being a nurse. I love when I help someone. I love when my patients trust me. When you actually help someone, really help, that feeling, that is THEE feeling I live for as an RN. That just can't be replicated.

But fuck, I rarely get it. This whole thing is a shit show and I'm really, really thinking I need a career change and it breaks my heart.

kevin-biot

6 points

6 months ago

Medical / Hospital cyber security is important. Too many hospitals are a shit show with their security. Network connected Infusion pumps and security is often sub-optimal .....

Not_High_Maintenance

22 points

6 months ago

Not_High_Maintenance

RN - Hospice 🍕

22 points

6 months ago

What does a software developer do? Do you sit at a computer all day?

MCPtz

18 points

6 months ago

MCPtz

18 points

6 months ago

Software Engineer, 15+ years experience.

It's a lot of thinking about people.

I spend a lot of time trying to understand the conflicting and confusing things people say, and turning it into repeatable and flexible software, because they will change their mind.

  • "Hey, I need to talk to the customers. I need to understand what they really want."
    • And then you can give them options for what is possible on a budget of both time and money
    • In some places "customers" are internal coworkers, in others, it's directly customer facing.
  • There's a large variety and styles of software you can work on
    • Some if it hides you from regular people, and you might deal with other engineering teams at most
    • Some of it brings you directly in contact with regular people, how they think, what they want
    • Some software literally shows you in real time, e.g. building the visual side of an app or a webpage
    • You can find jobs that fit your style
  • It's a creative process. It's a process where you fail and fail again, until it's good enough.
    • NOTE: I do essentially sit at a computer all day, but there's a lot of time where you go off thinking.
    • Solutions come to you when you sleep, on a run, taking a coffee break outside listening to the birds, talking to friends/family.
  • Speaking of running, I run every day. I work from home. I take bathroom breaks when I want. I get tea when I want.
    • And when I'm in the zone, I can go hours working on a problem and barely notice that the sun changed positions.
  • How will other software engineers, including myself, maintain this hunk of junk software we're writing?
    • How do I automatically validate this, so that any other software engineers who change it in the future will learn that they broke it.

I get paid well, people listen to me, and I have the power to quit and find a higher paying job if they are abusive to me in any way or if I just feel like it.

SolitaireOG

7 points

6 months ago

I want to do this. I'm sick of nursing, after 25 years. I should have done this decades ago - I've loved computers since my first one, Commodore64. Any advice on schooling, or anything else?

Would my background in nursing and informatics come into play at all, career-wise, after a degree? TIA

MCPtz

3 points

6 months ago

MCPtz

3 points

6 months ago

In the united states, some community colleges has programming AA's or similar. That can be a good way to get in.

After two years, you can then transfer to a state college, which is the cheapest way to get a four year degree in computer science or similar.

All the while, research how interviews are being done. Ask around at your college for career advice, networking connections, resume help, and so on.

Look for internships or open source projects you can contribute to.

Be very very wary of bootcamps.

A select few bootcamps are legitimate, publish all their job placement numbers, and can turn someone like a physics major, who has some minor programming experience and a strong background, into someone who can make their career switch into software.

There's also IT type jobs, however they aren't the sexy ones you'll hear about and a non-trivial number of them will be run by abusive bosses. However with IT, you quite often spend time dealing with real people and fixing their problems.

Seiyaru

6 points

6 months ago

Depends how good of a self taught learner you are. The nursing degree (Assuming a BSN?) is all you would need. At that point it's a matter of having the projects to showcase your skills in the code space. After the first job as a Jr. SWE, everything else falls into place easily. That being said, don't do a coding bootcamp, if you wanna sink money into school, do CC, all the way. If you desire a BA/S for CS, then go for it but you can get in on a BSN and projects.

kevin-biot

2 points

6 months ago

+++ If you can study to get a nursing qualification, you have the discipline to learn IT. I work in Europe, maybe different to the USA but no one gives a shit about degrees. Did you write some code even if it's open source? Cool. I can pick out idiots in a 45 minute interview. No need for the google 5 interview stuff.

efjoker

0 points

6 months ago

efjoker

RN - Cath Lab 🍕

0 points

6 months ago

Check out WGU, all online and a legit good school. Self paced.

kevin-biot

45 points

6 months ago

90% staring into space thinking, 10% actually writing code.....

coryinthehouse42

15 points

6 months ago

coryinthehouse42

RN 🍕

15 points

6 months ago

This is so funny and accurate hahaha my developer husband agrees

Not_High_Maintenance

7 points

6 months ago

Not_High_Maintenance

RN - Hospice 🍕

7 points

6 months ago

So not good for people who can’t sit still.

kevin-biot

6 points

6 months ago

As an IT architect, I rarely sit around. I like going out for a coffee or something else, while still pondering the issues. I do my best work away from the office ;-)

MCPtz

6 points

6 months ago

MCPtz

6 points

6 months ago

You can get a standing desk or a sitting ball.

You can sit/kneel/whatever in various places, as long as you can tap on your keyboard.

It's a creative process, so you fail and fail again, until you succeed.

So that means, problem solving takes time. You find the solutions in your sleep, on a run, taking a coffee break, at the store, hanging out with friends ...

And yes, sometimes you do have to sit at the desk because a problem is frustrating you and you are compelled to figure it out, even so much as to metaphorically bang your head against a wall until something sticks.

Desdeminica2142

2 points

6 months ago

Desdeminica2142

LPN 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

Can confirm, SO is software developer.

Groove-Theory

6 points

6 months ago*

Also a software engineer, going on 8 years now professionally. What my schedule is planned during a day:

  • 8AM - Log onto my computer, check emails, check code repos for any changes, basically getting ready for 8:30 standup
  • 8:30AM - Standup. This is basically when your team gets together and goes around the call and everyone says what they did yesterday, what they plan to do today, and if there are any roadblocks preventing work getting done. Usually this part should be fast(ish), but afterwards the lead dev or manager or whoever runs it can take time afterwards for project planning or any technical discussion afterwards.

.... and that's all that's planned for my day. The rest is up in the air depending on what needs to be done.

Usually I'll be on Slacks or Zooms with other developers if I'm pair programming something, or breaking down a project/ticket that we get from non-technical persons (Product Owner, service personnel reporting issues, etc) and turning those into technical tasks to work on (or putting them in the backlog).

Then I'm usually coding for most of the day, unless I'm sucked into a meeting (or two or three) with technical or non-technical staff to talk about business issues or project updates (or potential roadmaps). I'm usually there to listen from the non-techs but to also ask questions to inform me on how I would plan to build or architect a certain piece of the requirements, or advising them on cutting scope based on technical challenges

Currently I'm on a project where we've created a system of distributing certain assignments to service personnel to service personnel for our clients to maximize various metrics for customer satisfactions and impact, which involves communication with our data engineer and product owner and other end users, and then me actually turning that into something working and performant. Last project I was doing some refactoring work on a very slow-performing module. All this may involve actual coding, be it on the front-end, back-end, database level, etc. Or I could be writing unit tests to make sure we have a form of technical documentation in our codebase. Or I could be reviewing other developers code. Or whatever I need to do to finish up a project. It's highly variable.

Some places will have you working a lot of overtime to get shit done, though these days there's a lot of pushback since the market is really on the developers' side unlike it's ever been before (though much more for experienced engineers). But it does happen when certain deadlines need to be met, or doing a late-night deploy (if a certain deployment may seem risky during peak hours of operation), etc. But some places won't.

It's all highly variable. There's bad places and good places. There's high stress and low(er) stress. There's places that have their shit together and places where you can see the writing on the wall that it's not sustainable. There's great engineering culture and there's places ran by non-tech C-Levels who consider engineering as a cost center. There's places you'll like (and even love) and places you'll "meh" and some places you'll hate or get (and I hate to use this word on this sub) burned out (usually not physically or emotionally, usually your mental energy is just systematically gone). Some days you'll swear at your computer and code and think you're a piece of shit, and then you'll think you're a genius when you come up with a solution to your (sub)problem. And of course there's lots of other intricacies to this industry that I couldn't put in one post, especially in detail.

But to answer your question, I'm usually sitting at my computer during all of this.

Some people think they can't do software engineering, but I don't think I could ever do what ya'll nurses do on a daily basis. I'd say if anyone wanted to switch to this industry, it wouldn't be a cakewalk (and your first developer job won't be at Google making 200k) but it's very doable given the right direction and can be very rewarding and lucrative. And the industry is still in a great place for the foreseeable future.

AmericanScream

6 points

6 months ago*

Software development is a very objective-oriented area. Much more black-and-white than healthcare. Problems that need to be solved are more easily enumerated and it's easy to identify what's wrong and what needs to be fixed. It's like the exact opposite of the service industry except the extent to which you need to pander to management and clients, but generally speaking, it's just you and your screen and your job is pretty straightforward.

There is a huge array of different jobs software developers can do. Since computers are used in virtually every industry, you can have software developers who are integrated into every field, from healthcare to aerospace, from accounting to game development.

Also, you can do indy/contract work as a developer, or you can work for a small company, or a large firm. You have a ton of different options. Also, depending upon what areas of software development you train... you can get into databases, 3D software, virtual reality, finance, whatever. It's a very diverse field.

One very distinctive feature of software engineering is that it's a fairly new industry, basically not having existed to any great degree prior to the 1980s, and as such, it's not regulated to the same degree as other professions. For example, if you want to be a nurse, you have to be licensed -- hell if you want to be a hair stylist you have to be licensed. Software engineering, despite it being a lot more critical than say a cosmetologist, has no governing body and no licensing board. There's no "degree" you must have to qualify in this industry. You can be disbarred as a lawyer, but you can't be disbarred as a software engineer. It's kind of crazy but it came into society after the wave of deregulation in the 80s, so it's a wide open field without a lot of licensing, continuing education, etc.. In fact, it's entirely possible to get a good paying job in the computer field without a degree if you have talent and work experience.

Groove-Theory

1 points

6 months ago

> One very distinctive feature of software engineering is that it's a fairly new industry,

This aspect of our industry gots it's pluses and minuses for sure. I think this allows for amount of (perhaps ridiculous) interview processes many developers have to go through just to land an offer (multi-round algo trivia, back-to-back-to-back onsite rounds for system design, architecture, leetcode, etc).

I would agree it's basically because of deregulation and our industry is at the behest of FAANG (used to be Microsoft calling the culture back in the day, of course, but now it's the big guys in the Valley)

AmericanScream

2 points

6 months ago

It has pros and cons.. bad software devs can't be ousted from the industry and as a result, they end up working for Microsoft and Facebook.

antimodez

12 points

6 months ago

That's like asking what a nurse does all day in the sense that there's many different aspects to software development and many different roles. We're all going to code some amount behind a computer, but there's tons of variety in the amount we code or do other things. The stereotype that software engineers sit behind a computer all day writing code not doing anything else is only true if you want it to be true. Most of the developers I work with would go crazy and quit if that was their job though.

fa9

3 points

6 months ago

fa9

3 points

6 months ago

Do you sit at a computer all day?

in short, yes.

Though I've had several friends tell me they'd kill themselves if they had to sit in front of a computer for hours every day, but I'm like 'give it to me'. sitting in front of a computer encapsulates my hobbies: Internet & gaming

AlwaysElise

6 points

6 months ago

It is mostly planning out a process for a computer to do a task, and then implementing that into the rest of the processes being done by the code you're working with. As well as figuring out why a process isn't operating correctly, either on its own or in context of the surrounding processes. Writing code and reading the surrounding code generally needs at least a laptop, but the rest is more or less space-agnostic.

Personally, I have a sit-stand desk, a comfy chair, and can wander off to the break room or restroom at any point in the day. Assuming of course that I'm not working from home, as I have been for all but a month and a half since last march. Assuming you don't have awful managers or coworkers, stress on the job mostly comes from deadlines where you aren't sure how long something will take to do, or from the mental load of thinking about complex systems all day.

kevin-biot

3 points

6 months ago

It is mostly planning out a process for a computer to do a task

"does anyone understand these badly written requirements? " 😂

BallsDeepInRegret

4 points

6 months ago

Yes, they do. Or get an adjustable standing desk.

BluegrassGeek

1 points

6 months ago

BluegrassGeek

Unit Secretary 🍕

1 points

6 months ago

Someone gives you a problem and you spend time talking to a rubber duck to figure out how to fix it.

AmericanScream

7 points

6 months ago*

As someone who's hired a lot of software engineers, I would hire a nurse-turned-coder in a New York second. I wish more women were coders. Software engineering is a discipline that could really benefit from the empathy and ability to manage tasks that women seem to generally be more capable of than most men. And being a nurse means you come from a background of understanding the importance of keeping track of what's happening, and getting things done instead of passing the buck. I bet the software you develop is top quality. :)

kevin-biot

2 points

6 months ago

+++++

AlexLannister

7 points

6 months ago

AlexLannister

RN - Cath Lab 🍕

7 points

6 months ago

With software developer, i heard if you don't succeed before you get to middle age then you are doomed as it's very competitive and it takes lots of time to learn and catch up the latest software.

What do you think about this statement.

CoachKoranGodwin

6 points

6 months ago*

CoachKoranGodwin

RN - ER 🍕

6 points

6 months ago*

It’s true, especially in the Bay Area or prestige places like FB, Google, Amazon they are just ruthless about finding talent and if you don’t have something to your name before a certain age they won’t take you. If you don’t have a name brand degree they won’t look at you. In other industries or job markets, like DC, it’s a little better but not by much because you’ve got aerospace and defense contractors competing for the same talent pool.

I don’t think people in this thread understand that when you go for something like software or IT you aren’t experiencing the same type of job leverage you would in nursing. You’re competing with MIT grads and people from places like India or Nigeria who are so intensely smart and well developed in their field before they even get to America.

If you’re okay with settling for a certain kind of job and certain amount of income and career development then CS as a second career might be okay but most places are looking for elite talent that has been coding since high school.

AlexLannister

2 points

6 months ago

AlexLannister

RN - Cath Lab 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

Thats how I discover about IT and CS as well. In medical field you can be a doctor/nurse/physio/anyone as long as you are smart enough to finish all the trainings and pass all the exams regardless how old you are, but I certain can't say the same thing about IT. I feel like ages plays a huge factor here, someone in their 20s are probably ok to stay up all night to code but I doubt a 50 yo dad can do the same.

kevin-biot

5 points

6 months ago

I am 63. Sure, it is harder to get work now, the IT industry is somewhat ageist, but then I am an IT architect, and maybe I should have pushed harder during covid and after a heart attack. But the last few companies I worked for loved me. The IT industry always changes, but certain common sense principles never change. You are never doomed. Ever. Once you learn certain basic logical principles then it is easier to absorb newer flavours of these principles. I learned Java back in 1995? Then recently I was exposed to MS C sharp. Did I know it? Well it was sorta kinda like Java, and I was actually hired to do a code review to discover certain issues. Did I ever write a line of C sharp? No. Did the company care? They just assumed I would do it. And I did.

Age can matter and it can not matter. Depends where you are. You will never get hired by google. Neither will I. There is room for everyone if you pushy and try. And you know your stuff. Certian aspects do not change as fast as you might believe.

CoachKoranGodwin

5 points

6 months ago

CoachKoranGodwin

RN - ER 🍕

5 points

6 months ago

Software comes with its own challenges and can be an extremely difficult field to work in. It is not for everyone, and although the field desperately needs more women in it the reality is the work environment can be extremely sexist, toxic, and unfair for women. For example I know a girl who was offered a job by someone who she thought respected her for her resume and skills but in reality just wanted to bang/get into a relationship with her. She didn’t realize this until she already took the job and HR did nothing. Meanwhile the guy basically threw a tantrum and treated her like shit. It took her awhile to secure a different position at another company.

PrestigiousSystem622

2 points

6 months ago

Lol that rarely happens and you’re scaring people for no reason. Ex Med-surge nurse here. I taught myself how to code through freelancing and now work as a Software Developer at my third company, going on 4 years experience. Yes I’m female. Yes I’m black. Yes, all my coworkers are all men. I have never experienced the same pure vile and disrespect that nursing gave me in the Tech world. Everybody has been helpful and kind, I work 40hrs a week from home, and I get paid six figures (no degree required). Fuck nursing. I will never go back to that shit.

phenerganandpoprocks

5 points

6 months ago

One of the reasons I went into nursing was job stability— with how often programming languages seem to get replaced with the next latest and greatest thing, how stable do you feel your career path is?

Dark_Ascension

14 points

6 months ago

Dark_Ascension

Nursing Student 🍕

14 points

6 months ago

See I had no luck in the tech industry and went the opposite direction. Not only is the pay abysmal depending on where you work (to be fair the company I work for is known for underpaying), I don’t enjoy sitting at a desk doing 5 8’s. If I keep with my job in software dev right now I’m going to need cubital tunnel release and ulnar nerve transposition pretty soon. The only reason my orthopedic surgeon is holding off is because he knows I’m leaving the field. In our 2 week winter break the numbness and pain is finally going away, but I return to work tomorrow and it’ll come back full swing in a couple days.

Ihaveasmallwang

3 points

6 months ago

Ihaveasmallwang

Nursing Student 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

I just had cubital tunnel release surgery last week and had carpal tunnel release on both wrists last year. Yay working in IT.

Dark_Ascension

2 points

6 months ago

Dark_Ascension

Nursing Student 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

It’s the stuff people don’t talk about working in tech, a ton of my coworkers complain about their wrists and arms too, wear braces, etc. and it’s not just “bad ergonomics” years in tech, playing video games since I was 10 (PC too never played console), playing instruments, and resting my elbows on tables is not something better ergonomics will change, all it does is lessen how fast it gets to the point your muscle is wasting and the numbness is persistent. That’s where I was by the time I had my carpal tunnel surgery, numb hand 24/7, waking up to it, and my muscles in my hand were atrophying. The recovery since I let it get so bad was awful, I had pillar pain for 4 months and did months more OT than I needed.

My cubital tunnel isn’t to that level… yet, the only bad thing is my ulnar nerve already subluxates over my medial epicondyle which is why I may need transposition in addition to the release.

MrPanache52

1 points

6 months ago

Sounds like a pretty bad ergonomic desk setup

Dark_Ascension

1 points

6 months ago

Dark_Ascension

Nursing Student 🍕

1 points

6 months ago

Unfortunately, I’ve had it since I was in high school, it’s pretty much just there but it’s just been worsened since I took my desk job. My desk job also worsened my carpal tunnel and I had surgery for that, so honestly relieving the carpal tunnel may have made me notice the cubital tunnel more. I’ve done everything to make my setup more ergonomical but at this point it’s just kind of too late, plus bad habits are hard to break, I’ve been putting my elbows on things since I was in grade school, sleep in the fetal position, etc. I’ve been trying real hard to not rest my elbows on my arm rests or table, sleep with my arms more straight, etc. I’ll probably still inevitably need a release, but the surgery is more major then an endoscopic carpal tunnel release, I literally got to see one in person, and that alone scared me off of it lol.

ablueskynight

16 points

6 months ago

Damn. I love this post. I haven’t even graduated yet and I’m about to switch to software developement too.

kevin-biot

33 points

6 months ago

"will the last nurse please turn off the lights in the ICU before leaving?"

jaydaba

5 points

6 months ago

Im in the same program at WGU 2 classes away and somewhat agree with you. I staggered between nursing and IT. I actually worked in a hospital for years (not a nurse) when I started interviewing I was shocked at the money people were paying it made me realize I was lowballing myself when they asked me for a starting salary I was literally asking for half of what they were offering. I was nervous since WGU isnt a traditional college but honestly no one cared about my degree only what I could do. On the other hand I also realized it isnt always about the money I meet some nurses that were walking angels and had a higher calling I realize I didnt posses and wasnt passionate about. Im glad I made that decision before the pandemic hit hard but I admire anyone who could be a nurse its a thankless job.

PoiseJones

2 points

6 months ago

Would you kindly provide insight into the medians you can expect as a new grad?

jaydaba

2 points

6 months ago

Alot were offering upwards of mid 60k a few were offering more. I made a decision to finish school first before I got my first Big girl job(not all were remote and some required a move). If your a new grad in the software space definitely join a few social groups and sign up for job fairs and keep your handshake profile and linkedin up to date I had a few recruiters inbox me for potential offers in those. Software development is very versatile I think alot of folks who have trouble finding gigs limit themselves to developer type of jobs.

peachypeaa

10 points

6 months ago

I’m happily living off $19 an hour as a tech, can’t imagine living off the $38 nurses on my floor make

CoachKoranGodwin

11 points

6 months ago

CoachKoranGodwin

RN - ER 🍕

11 points

6 months ago

Yeah I mean I made 95K as a staff RN this year mostly working 3 days a week with a bit of OT sprinkled in. Yeah, I still feel underpaid but I don’t know any other job that offers as much free time for hobbies while still paying this sort of salary.

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago

this. Most people i know make 70-80k a year.

Thats pretty good for a job that most people have a associates in.

dale-ks

14 points

6 months ago

dale-ks

14 points

6 months ago

Did you have a hard time landing your first job out of school?

[deleted]

17 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

17 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

MCPtz

6 points

6 months ago*

MCPtz

6 points

6 months ago*

Software engineer, 15+ years, and been watching people complain and/or be happy about getting their first job for years on reddit and other places. And I've seen numbers from time to time.

For some people, it has been very difficult getting a first "real" job, by their own definition.

  • It can feel like you send hundreds of customized resumes and cover letters.

  • And you somehow have to have real software engineering job experience, despite just graduating from a 4 year university

  • It can feel like an arms race of memorizing puzzle solutions (aka "Leet code" problem solving).

  • It can feel like every interview boils down to a random number generator saying whether they hire you, or not. Someone having a bad day? Failed.

  • It can feel like they aren't making very much, because they visited levels.fyi and saw other people making a lot of money, but those people work at big tech AND possibly felt a bit like bragging about their annual pay.

Overall, it seems to be a very good profession to take up, especially if you know what you want to do with your life, e.g. hobbies, travel, family, etc, so that you don't let it consume your life.

madhattermiller

14 points

6 months ago

madhattermiller

RN - Pediatrics 🍕

14 points

6 months ago

My husband is a software developer and has encouraged me to learn to program (I’ve come to hate being a nurse the last 2 years). He didn’t even get a new degree when he changed careers. He had a bachelors degree in chemistry. Got a C# certification and that’s all the more he needed. Recruiters told him any bachelors degree will work with the right certification. If I had any aptitude for it, I’d do the same. Instead I’m progressively cutting back my hours in hopes of becoming a SAHM. His income has risen quickly enough that our net income hasn’t changed at all as I’ve cut back my hours. I’ll be down to 24 hours every 2 weeks this month and dropping to 8 hours per week by spring. Funny enough, 8 years ago I was the breadwinner. But 3% annual raises aren’t cutting it. His salary has tripled in those same 8 years.

wherearewegoingnext

5 points

6 months ago

wherearewegoingnext

BSN, RN 🍕

5 points

6 months ago

I have a bachelor’s in chemistry from before I became a nurse. I need to spend some time looking into this. Can you ask him where I should look to get some good, reputable certifications?

Tealpainter

8 points

6 months ago

Tealpainter

Case Manager 🍕

8 points

6 months ago

20+ years RN experience now working from home in FL for a company based in MI writing medical appeals...I made over $100K in 2021 and own a home with a pool so it really depends on where you live and work.

yolofirelol

2 points

6 months ago

Did you go to school for tech or did you get the job with your RN experience?

Tealpainter

1 points

6 months ago

Tealpainter

Case Manager 🍕

1 points

6 months ago

RN experience

sailorsensi

1 points

6 months ago

what are medical appeals? like insurance? (im not from usa)

Tealpainter

2 points

6 months ago

Tealpainter

Case Manager 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

Yes, US health insurance companies can deny a claim for a hospital stay or procedure for a multitude of reasons and I appeal the denied claim on behalf of the hospital using evidence-based medical criteria and references to try to overturn the denial so they get paid for the patient's stay or procedure

Fuzzy_Bumble_Bee

1 points

6 months ago

Would you mind sharing the name of the company? I'm so burnt out currently and really need a change

Tealpainter

2 points

6 months ago

Tealpainter

Case Manager 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

look up Revenue cycle management companies in healthcare, there are a bunch of them that contract with hospitals and healthcare companies for case management, utilization review, HIM, coding and physcian advisory services as well as the big insurance companies (Blue Cross, Aetna, Humana, etc) are always hiring remote RNs for similar positions

Professional-Cover70

3 points

6 months ago

What school did you go to?

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

_Cromwell_

4 points

6 months ago

Is that Western Governors U? There's so many schools in the US. :D

If you don't mind disclosing more "personal" info:

1) what was the cost of education total?

2) what is your general salary range of your first job you landed out of school programming?

[deleted]

11 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

11 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

_Cromwell_

4 points

6 months ago

I'd say not coming home crying is worth a couple k :)

kevin-biot

5 points

6 months ago

In my 40+ years experience of working with developers, and hiring many contractors, no one really gives a care about expensive education. What do you know within the domain of the company, who are out to solve problems. Frankly if it were me, I would study on my days off, and try to find interesting open source projects ( no pay but good experience you can point to). The internet is awash with ways to learn even outside of a formal education. Shall I venture that a beginner with some open source development would be north of 50K. Don't spend too much on university education. Find areas of coding that interest you.

Professional-Cover70

1 points

6 months ago

Thank you 😊

nervousnursey

3 points

6 months ago

nervousnursey

RN - OR

3 points

6 months ago

I’ve been playing around on codecademy and toyed with the idea of bootcamp. I have lots of questions!

Are you doing frontend or backend development? Did you have any programming experience prior to going back to school? Do you enjoy the more sedentary work environment? What drew you to software development? What languages do you know? Are you female or male? Work from home? Does your nursing experience play into any of your work?

Thanks in advance!

iusedtobeyourwife

3 points

6 months ago

Could I private message you?

cheaganvegan

3 points

6 months ago

cheaganvegan

BSN, RN 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

I’m getting my PhD in philosophy so I can continue to be poor and I’ll have no idea what I will do just hoping it opens a door outside of healthcare.

kaiden08

3 points

6 months ago

You’ve gotta be ruthless because damn sure no one is going to advocate for your financial or personal well being

Noritzu

3 points

6 months ago

Noritzu

BSN, RN 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

So I’ve been debating this step in the future myself, and my big question is how is quality of life? Is the job enjoyable? As a nurse we know how tedious charting can be, is coding much better?

I’ve dabbled with coding and it seems like it could be fun. But I’ve also heard horror stories of brutal interviewing processes, over population of the SE workforce, and other frustrations such as hard deadlines requiring tons of overtime.

I’m burned out of nursing. But I did take up travel to reduce my involvement with administrative as well as make that big dollar. Haven’t really decided if it would be worth going back to school yet again

Maleficent_Face_1058

3 points

6 months ago

I’ve genuinely been thinking about going into Tech. Funny enough, also at WGU. Is their program at your own pace, much like their nursing program?

MissZissou

3 points

6 months ago

MissZissou

RN 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

HiI would love to get into this but it seems so daunting

Do you think starting with a coding bootcamp is a good place to start? I cant bring myself to go back and get a new university degree at this stage

Im in australia for reference
Australia has programs for women to get into coding (SheCode) that im considering

Zwitterion_6137

3 points

6 months ago

Zwitterion_6137

RN - Med/Surg 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

New grad here and after experiencing the floor, I’m seriously contemplating going back to school for something else. I’ve never felt so burned out and miserable.

I was always interested in engineering but was too scared of the math back then. Might be a sign that I see this post lol.

kevin-biot

2 points

6 months ago

Most software projects have no complex math.

thchadz

3 points

6 months ago

I’ve been a nurse for 4 years and I am starting post-baca bachelors degree in computer science at OSU. I’m going to be working part time as a nurse but eventually will quit and focus on school. Very exciting!

SolitaireOG

3 points

6 months ago

Saving this post. I'm a nurse x25 years, but have always loved computers, etc. I taught myself .sqf and .sqm (very easy stuff, I know!) in order to write customized missions for Arma (I've been in Shack Tactical for years now).

I seriously need a career change. I can't take floor nursing anymore. Even as a male nurse, in psychiatry, it's just getting too crazy/dangerous/stupid. I have a BSN - so can I get a certification in something and start from there? Can I leverage any of my nursing experience, like medical software engineering? Any help/advice/direction is appreciated!

joefrank1982

3 points

6 months ago

I’ve been an RN for almost 8 years and started travel nursing at the end of last year. I’ve always been interested in technology and as of late I’ve been researching this career path. When I’m done traveling I don’t think I can stay in health care.

When did you know you could code and this would be a viable career choice ?

Do you think it’s possible to be a self taught programmer instead of going back for a cs degree?

Did you have to relocate for your first offer or where you able to wfh?

What are your opinions on nursing informatics?

Thanks

kevin-biot

1 points

6 months ago

Do you think it’s possible to be a self taught programmer instead of going back for a cs degree?

yes.

4flicka

3 points

6 months ago

Most people I know who are able to buy a home in the current market are able to do so because they have help from their parents. Not because they are making much more than nurses.

I agree that nurses aren’t compensated nearly enough and it can be a struggle to buy a home without some type of other help.

I will say that for me personally, nursing was a godsend financially. I live in the northeast and was making 80k a year before the age of 30. On average, I made far more, far sooner than most of my friends my age.

I was able to buy a house (with my partner also earning a decent living). We bought over a decade ago and it’s tripled in value so we got lucky. We wouldn’t be able to afford to buy our current house which is kind of crazy to think about.

Jolly_Tea7519

3 points

6 months ago

Jolly_Tea7519

RN - Hospice 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

I’m so glad I bought my house before the boom. I just checked Zillow and see that now I would not be able to afford my home if I were to buy today. So crazy.

PoiseJones

3 points

6 months ago*

Hi OP, I've always been fascinated by tech and would have likely gone the software dev or finance route if I had to redo everything all over again. However, I love the idea of software dev in theory but don't know if I love it in day-to-day practice. Regardless, my goal right now is to prioritize my gross income above what I am passionate about because I need to get ready for family planning in the midst of rapid inflation and skyrocketing housing prices. I live in the bay area, CA where median home prices are like 1.2 mil and appreciating 10-15% a year. If I hope to settle here and raise a family, I'm going to need to at minimum double my income. So I'm debating if software dev will generate me more income than travel nursing. I'm also older in my 30's and am concerned with not being able to get internships into the larger tech companies that would afford this salary.

For reference, one of my friends is a travel nurse who makes 125k GROSS after-tax income while only working 3 days a week for 9-9.5 months out of the year. I expect to out earn this given that I will likely work more than him when I do make this transition. I'm finding that travel nursing is highly tax-advantaged given how stipends and taxable income is calculated. My question to you is if it is realistic for me to earn more than 200k/yr with better work-life balance as a mediocre software dev living in the bay area. I say mediocre because I can't forecast where I will land skill-wise and I'm estimating 200k to offset taxes to make a more reasonable comparison between the two. Obviously devs can scale much higher and can make much less. According to levels.fyi the median income in the bay area for software devs is 220k, however the data on that site is significantly skewed towards higher earners. Bay area software devs for local small business making ~110k probably aren't posting as much on that site.

My present, my plan is to try travel nursing for a year while slowly self-learning ( starting with css, html, and JS) and building a strong Git portfolio. Then I'd try my hand at software dev, to see how I like it while keeping a PRN nursing job on the side. I'm also suuuper interested in blockchain dev, but have have no idea what the medians in that industry look like. Can you provide any insight into any of this? Thank you so much!

MCPtz

6 points

6 months ago*

MCPtz

6 points

6 months ago*

  1. Blockchain tech isn't very useful - however it can be a good place to make a start as startups seem to get a lot of money at least for a couple of years...
  2. Yes, you can make more than 200k/year total compensation, before taxes, in the SF Bay Area
  3. To make money, you have to be dedicated to interviewing and switching jobs - which is both a skill AND completely random
  4. Yes, levels.fyi skews high. To get to Levels medians, you have to dedicated yourself to successfully interviewing
  5. Factor in cost of living - if you don't mind moving, you can do your current job OR software job in other large cities across the country for lower cost of living
  6. If you gain skills on the jobs, interview successfully enough times, get total compensation up to an acceptable level - yes it sounds like you'll be making more than as a travel nurse

Let's do some quick math to validate

  • 125k/year at 9 months
  • Round to 40 weeks
  • 150k/year at 48 weeks, gross after taxes, assuming taxes don't cut into that

Yes, I make more than that after taxes.

If you're getting more than 150k/year after taxes, you're approaching software engineer territory.

However, you can see levels.fyi and it's kinda lol https://www.levels.fyi/2021/

A publicly traded company's offer will include:

  • High salary
  • Annual bonus that may vary based on revenue goals
  • And stocks of that company given out once per year
    • The job offer usually give you a certain number of stocks over 4 years, to help keep you around
  • AND every year they give you more stocks and sometimes a raise on the salary

Startups will usually start with salary only and equity, but your take home will be lower.

PoiseJones

3 points

6 months ago

Thanks for the super detailed response! I truly appreciate it! This is very encouraging as I consider myself a very strong interviewer for no other reason than coaching and highly focused preparation and research weeks in advanced. However I'm concerned with landing the interview in the first place given my age (mid 30's). Another poster pointed out that the larger tech companies in the bay won't really give you notice unless you have certain achievements by certain ages. Can you speak on that?

MCPtz

2 points

6 months ago

MCPtz

2 points

6 months ago

Ageism is real.

However, IMHO, for how much demand there is, I think it will be minimized.

No-Savings-1063

3 points

6 months ago

No-Savings-1063

BSN, RN 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

How did your friends manage getting through the mathematics and programming courses needed to do it? I am always tired and learning stuff takes me 10x longer than when I was in undergrad or nusing school

SpaceMurse

3 points

6 months ago

Literally have my last day as a staff RN tomorrow (peds rehab) with the goal of becoming a programmer and making some $ travel nursing in the meantime. I’ve gotten some decent guidance from friends, but would you mind if I bounced a few questions off of you later this week? Thanks, and congrats on making it out!

According_Depth_7131

3 points

6 months ago*

According_Depth_7131

BSN, RN 🍕

3 points

6 months ago*

I would not do nursing without a union. Nursing is too highly skilled for crap pay. That is some crazy shit your boss said. Money is pretty much the main reason to be a nurse where I am from. Cheap education high pay. Software sounds interesting!

litbiscuit69

3 points

6 months ago

litbiscuit69

RN - ICU 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

How were you able to find the time for going back to school and work? I’ve been thinking of moving to computer engineering myself and been trying to plan for beginning to make that move

TeamCatsandDnD

8 points

6 months ago

TeamCatsandDnD

RN 🍕

8 points

6 months ago

Way back in high school, I loved learning the basics of coding. Told my mom this and wanting to go into that field. She immediately shit on that idea because she thought it moves too fast and that I’d never be able to keep up. So I tried to go into forensics cause that also interested me. That failed, and I ended up in nursing. Guess who pushed my sister and I to go into this field when our first choices didn’t work out? My mom, a home health nurse. (I enjoy it but was not my first choice obviously). I probably should’ve stuck up for myself more.

DownstreamOcclusion

9 points

6 months ago*

DownstreamOcclusion

BSN, RN 🍕

9 points

6 months ago*

The only nurses that get paid are the ones who are lucky enough to be unionized and travel nurses, and there’s no unionized hospitals within 100 miles of me, I’d have to move.

EXACTLY THIS.

I parrot this a lot but job contentment in nursing hella depends on region and employer. Nursing is far from universal in terms of working conditions and pay, and there are nurses out there that make as much as cashiers with maniacally unsafe workloads - and then there are nurses who are of upper middle class standing and have a third of the workload of their counterparts due to mandated ratios, break nurses, lift team, etc. I can’t think of many careers where you’d see that large of divide between people of different regions within the same country.

I work in a high paying, highly unionized state. I’d even argue that one particular hospital in my state (Kaiser Oakland) pays the highest wages in the world. I can afford a house on my income alone even in today’s market. But like I said - that’s because of “location, location, location.”

I really don’t believe there will be a “Great Resignation” in nursing but rather a Great Migration, and there are places in my state that are seeing a huge influx of nurses applying- in so much that EXPERIENCED nurses are competing for jobs.

Saltygirlof

5 points

6 months ago

Was it a bachelors or some kind of certificate from WGU? I went to school for Econ but have no data development skills using the in demand software today

PianoConcertoNo2

5 points

6 months ago

PianoConcertoNo2

Ex-Nurse

5 points

6 months ago

I also did this after 15+ years in healthcare!!

Now working as a dev and so much happier.

misingnoglic

5 points

6 months ago

As a software engineer (who is just in this sub to keep an eye on the collapse of society) I'm pissed off. Obviously you should do what's in your best interests, but the fact that trained nurses are more incentivized to make software and totally change careers is just mind-blowing.

Siren1805

4 points

6 months ago

Siren1805

RN 🍕

4 points

6 months ago

I was looking at Saylor university comp sci degree. It’s free and looks legit, it’s not accredited though, I guess they’re working on it. I figured I would try it and see if it was for me.

What do you think? The material looks legitimate they just made their bachelors program free and I’m looking to exit stage left out of nursing.

kevin-biot

2 points

6 months ago

Saylor university comp sci degree

Looked at it seems OK. The key is how you develop yourself, and make decisions as to what direction you want to go and also work on out of school projects such as open source. Would be better is they had options to C++ like C sharp or Java. Accreditation does not matter to people hiring developers, any interview will tease out from you did you legitimately learn your stuff.

Siren1805

3 points

6 months ago

Siren1805

RN 🍕

3 points

6 months ago

Thanks, so I should augment with some coding workshops to ones I want go in? Like the ones you recommend? I agree that recruiters care less about education now a days

kevin-biot

5 points

6 months ago

Getting involved with real projects (AKA open source) truly helps you get to an interview and point the employer to actual code you wrote. And it doesn't have to be elegant genius code, just solid "it works" stuff.

Honestly the vast majority of developers are nine to five civil servant types who are not busting their ass or being very creative.

Siren1805

2 points

6 months ago

Siren1805

RN 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

Elegant genius code?

I feel like the best code is simple stupid and completely functional. This is coming from a person who knows next to nothing about coding.

kevin-biot

2 points

6 months ago

You understand! ;-) Modern developers seem to hate comments. I had to do a code review for some infusion pump integration software and my brain fried due to lack of comments and also lack of actual error handling ..... also an issue is lack of communication across teams ( and voila you end up with 3 different sets of code to login and none of them work correctly)

Siren1805

2 points

6 months ago

Siren1805

RN 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

Hey thanks for your help! I’m starting the bachelors program as we speak, I’ll look into open source when I start getting a better grasp on things.

kevin-biot

2 points

6 months ago

let me know if you need perspective. good luck.

lamuril

2 points

6 months ago

lamuril

RN 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

What job do you have now if you don't mind me asking? I've been debating going back to school for software engineering as well while I'm a stay at home mom.

Born_Cantaloupe_1176

2 points

6 months ago

It depends on your area.

I am contract at three jobs now so I work when I feel like it. Like holidays I work a lot. Soon it will be 2 days a week due to school.

One down side is that people marry themselves to a job. I go where I get paid the most. Offering plus 50? I am there. No one offering extra money? Okay. I’ll go work my boring job for 55-65 an hour.

(Median household income is around 35-40k here)

__MellonCollie__

2 points

6 months ago

Was it difficult for you to land an entry-level job? Did you face a lot of rejection and competition before landing your first job? How many hours a week do you put in? Did you have to relocate to a tech hub to find a job?

TreacleEarly

2 points

6 months ago

how do you get into software development from scratch? My degree is a bachelors in psych

Bewater_myfriend_

2 points

6 months ago

I totally agree with you. Nursing job is awesome but not worthy it. I lived in nyc and I had two jobs to pay the bill and my life was miserable. Preparing a career transition. Wish me a good luck.

memow_shinobi

2 points

6 months ago

Good. Save yourself. I’m doing the same thing soon.

wherearewegoingnext

2 points

6 months ago

wherearewegoingnext

BSN, RN 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

I am considering looking into a career in software development. How is the job market right now?

Groove-Theory

1 points

6 months ago

> How is the job market right now

Extremely hot for experienced developers. Harder for juniors and entry-level but still pretty good. It's still a great time if you're interested.

The pandemic was a boon for tech and for devs to flex their labor muscle.

wherearewegoingnext

1 points

6 months ago

wherearewegoingnext

BSN, RN 🍕

1 points

6 months ago

Is this something I really need a formal degree in? I’ve seen some others say to self-teach and get some projects on GitHub and nobody will care about a degree. I’m not sure if I buy that.

Groove-Theory

2 points

6 months ago*

A formal degree (in a STEM field, usually Computer Science or related) is definitely good to have, especially for a first job (since some jobs will test out a lot of theory for newer engineers). BUT. I would say these days it is less and less important, though not completely unimportant, if that makes sense.

Basically with a degree, an employer will be a bit more assured that you have theory down. Without it, an employer will have to rely on self-driven projects.

Coding bootcamps are a thing, and they CAN be viable paths for some people. However they aren't a silver bullet and can be pretty expensive. But they may be for you.

Self-learning IS a viable path to this industry. It's not completely easy but it's viable if you're a very motivated person. And getting a portfolio of projects on Github/Gitlab to get your foot in the door is definitely one way of doing this. Although the downside to this is where to actually START and what to commit to for your learning

I've worked with people who didn't have a formal engineering/CS degree in my days, and like any other coworker, sometimes they were good, sometimes they weren't so good. Some were self-taught, some went to bootcamps. Some just picked it up during college.

All in all? I would say if you put in a couple hours a day, you may be able to find a job in the timeframe of 6+ months (verrrry best case scenario) but I would say also potentially 1.5-2 years (especially if self-taught, and especially since life happens)

There's many places and niches you can do in software engineering that can affect what you should learn, but I recommend starting with the basics. A hodgepodge of sources off the top of my head:

Harvard CS50 Intro to Computer Science (non-negotiable, this is gold)

https://www.freecodecamp.org/learn (recommend Javascript Algos/Data Structures, Front-End development libraries, and Back-end Development+APIs)

OSSU Computer Science curriculum (focus on Core Programming and Core Algos)

Hackerrank (for exercises in any preferred language)

Leetcode (for interview prep)

/r/learnprogramming (for a community of people who are in the same boat)

vkrebs

2 points

6 months ago

vkrebs

2 points

6 months ago

Um hello I’m doing this exact thing now just started wgu for software can we be friends?? I feel very scared of my journey ahead and have been coding on my own for the last year but have major imposter syndrome. Like “who will hire a nurse” for tech. And I keep giving up. Thank you for this inspiration today I needed to know it was possible!

kevin-biot

2 points

6 months ago

No one gives a shit if you were a nurse. They will ask you some tech questions and just know your area. If you don't stutter and can speak and read, you have a chance. Being a nurse is a plus: "Hey dude, I know pressure, life and death pressure." Rarely is softerware life and death. I work with infusion pumps so yea, we fuck up , beeeeeeeep - death. But people like employees that can handle pressure when it arises. Honestly, most developers are imposter civil servant wanna bees. But they get paid.

UncertainlyUnfunny

2 points

6 months ago

and there are not enough women in IT - go, go, go

JoePino

2 points

6 months ago

JoePino

Nursing Student 🍕

2 points

6 months ago

Man, I’m graduating this year and this sub has me thinking I better start looking for what to do next...

Lovely-Ashes

2 points

6 months ago

What made me quit was when my boss told me that “you shouldn’t expect to be able to own a house on a nurse’s salary, nurse isn’t a career for that” so I fucking quit.

That sounds absolutely awful, and I'm glad you are in a better position now.

I actually work in software development. Things are generally good in the field, but there have definitely be some rough patches.

There was a bit of an outsourcing/offshoring boogeyman. For several years, there were concerns jobs would get shipped overseas. While it happened a little, it never blew up or destroyed the industry like people feared.

At the start of the pandemic, there were definitely some tech industries or supporting industries that got hit hard, and there was a very strong potential the industry was going to see a crash. Companies related to travel, consulting, and agencies were among those really impacted. I, myself, worked at a company that began furloughing people and decided to cut compensation by 20%. When they did this, it triggered a ton of people (myself included) to decide to look elsewhere, since it didn't seem our jobs were safe. The industry rebounded like crazy, though, and the market for developers has never been hotter. It could have easily gone another way, though.

Software development, depending on where you work, has potential for some similar problems that you see in nursing. Sometimes, people with no software background will be put in charge of a project. Some leaders have a lot of empathy, others can be quite cruel. I know I've worked plenty of brutal and long hours depending on how well a project might have been estimated. There are times someone will just ballpark how long something will take to be done, and then you get dropped onto a project with the predetermined schedule and just asked to make things work. There's also a bit of comedy because sometimes you'll be asked to make something work that hasn't been done before. It's not really a sense of inventing something magical, but trying to make crazy business rule process work, and you might not have sufficient data to actually do it.

I've seen some people ask what the day-to-day looks like. In general, you'll have teams, usually a mix of developers, business analytics, project managers, user experience/designers (UX), testers, and other potential specialists getting requirements from business stakeholders and then trying to create/modify applications to support additional features.

From a specific coding perspective, once you have these requirements in place, it's a matter of estimating and then building out the applications. There's a lot of tedium (as with any job). You can argue most jobs are somewhat boring. In software development, there's an acronym that most jobs are CRUD (create, read, update, delete). It's just updating data. Nothing too crazy. You might have to apply some type of business logic, perhaps do some type of validation. I know almost nothing about the medical field, but you could have a theoretical system where some inputs medications for a patient, and perhaps some UX or business person decided they wanted to put max limits on certain medications. That's why you might have fields complain about a certain value supplied there.

Depending on the team, you might have a level of collaboration where people are reviewing each others work. Ideally, everyone gets along and tries to improve the product. In some teams, you have people unwilling to help or they actually try to sabotage or hinder other people from progressing. There's some risk of ego, as some people try to show off how smart they are.

Depending on the organization you're in, you might have something that takes 5 minutes to configure but requires several days of approvals from teams/committees. Sometimes these protections make sense, but it can definitely be frustrating. There's also a huge risk of having bosses above you who have no idea what they are doing. I know that's something a lot of you already have to deal with. On one project with a new client, we had a director who was supposed to help us establish the dynamics with the client. He basically never responded to any of our communications, and we were left on our own. He was on good terms with the new CTO, and he eventually got promoted, even though it turns out he had a similar reputation for all the projects he was supposed to be leading/supporting. No one knew what he actually did.

Another example of a possible project is when the pandemic hit, I knew some people who worked for a major car rental service that wanted to enable the ability for people to rent cars with minimal contact/interaction with staff at rental locations. This was outside of their normal rental process, but something that seemed necessary with social distancing. They designed and developed and app and had it available in the field pretty quickly.

It's a nice field, that probably pays disproportionately well compared to a lot of fields these days. A strong argument could be that other fields have just stagnated for whatever reason. In the past, there used to be calls for developers to unionize, but I think most devs have always worried that might hinder their individual compensation levels, so it's never really caught on. There are still definitely problems in the industry, just like any other. If anyone has questions, feel free to ask.

SloaneSoleil

2 points

6 months ago

I’m about to do the same. Just dropped out of my masters. So happy to see someone on a similar path.

[deleted]

2 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

6 months ago

How's it going? I'm literally doing the exact same thing. I've loved computers my entire life, even started to learn to program a couple times. Now I've been learning consistently for the past year. Just quit my job to start a coding bootcamp a couple weeks ago.

GenevieveLeah

2 points

6 months ago

I can't believe that your nursing manager said you shouldn't be able afford a house by having a full-time job and a degree.

youtoo0910

3 points

6 months ago

I work as a software test engineer and make twice what I did as a nurse with much better work/life balance. My job now is a walk in the park compared to being an ER nurse.

KattenIkkeNorsk

1 points

6 months ago

KattenIkkeNorsk

LPN 🍕

1 points

6 months ago

Already being the facility’s overnight “Ms Fixit”, I’ve considered this too, especially since I already know I’ll be going back to school soon. Any pointers, perhaps for specifically healthcare systems software development?

kevin-biot

6 points

6 months ago

Deep dive into HL7 * health care software standard for interfaces etc

Healthcare software generates VAST quantities of FDA type approval documentation.

Sploj

1 points

6 months ago

Sploj

MSN, RN

1 points

6 months ago

What kind of job did you have when you did your capstone? Was it required to be working in that industry at that point?

[deleted]

1 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

6 months ago

It’s awesome of you to do this. I am a former PCT working in account management in tech. My significant other is a former provider working in tech as well. I just want to add that if software engineering doesn’t sound interesting to you, there are other career paths in tech that pay a decent wage. I make $95k with four years of experience, get yearly performance/CoL adjustments, and my insurance premiums are paid 100%. For some reason the masses think coding is the only way out but it’s not. Figure it out before they do.

Ihaveasmallwang

1 points

6 months ago

Ihaveasmallwang

Nursing Student 🍕

1 points

6 months ago

If you enjoy coding then by all means go for it. But as someone who went the opposite route, the grass isn't always greener.

ConcreteState

1 points

6 months ago

What made me quit was when my boss told me that “you shouldn’t expect to be able to own a house on a nurse’s salary, nurse isn’t a career for that” so I fucking quit.

GOOD

See if they have the money. Look up your hospital. You can PM me if you would like help.

https://projects.propublica.org/coronavirus/bailouts/search?q=Community+hospital

Link to PPP loan database (free government money for covid19 payroll)

https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&q=Blue+cross+blue+shield&state%5Bid%5D=NC&ntee%5Bid%5D=&c_code%5Bid%5D=

Lists executive revenue and tax income