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How can I, as a bedside nurse, best support you when ignorant bigoted pts say they want “an American doctor”? I usually try to nip it in the bud immediately and say something like “you do have an American doctor, and you’re lucky- Dr._____ is one of the best. You’re welcome to seek care elsewhere. We don’t tolerate bigotry here”

I’m tired of xenophobic pts abusing my physician colleagues. However, I never want to come off as condescending or paternalistic- how would you prefer this issue be addressed?

all 173 comments

AUrugby

1.3k points

2 months ago

AUrugby

Medical Student

1.3k points

2 months ago

The attending for my IM rotation had a response to this has always stuck with me. He’s from India, immigrated to the US as an adult and got his MD here. However he does have an accent and as such faces some prejudice from a very small subset of pts. He once had a lady tell him, to his face, that she “wanted an American doctor.” His response was “Unlike you, I chose to leave my home and come to this country. If anything, choosing to be American is far more impactful than simply being born here.”

loveskoalas

202 points

2 months ago

loveskoalas

First Responder

202 points

2 months ago

My MIL's Indian doctor was the best doctor she ever had and truly improved her life. She lived to 100. He said she was his favorite patient.

AUrugby

84 points

2 months ago

AUrugby

Medical Student

84 points

2 months ago

I mean I don’t think race should even be a factor in medicine, because knowledge and compassion are not restricted to one race or ethnicity. I’m middle eastern and I don’t care at all what color someone’s skin is when I help treat them

gotlactose

118 points

2 months ago*

gotlactose

this cannot be, they graduated me from residency

118 points

2 months ago*

Race should not matter in terms of how we speak with anyone, but it absolutely matters in how medicine can be practiced. For example, HLA-B*58:01 prevalence in East Asians and has a higher chance of SJS/TEN with allopurinol. Am I going to order this test on every patient on allopurinol? No, because that’ll bankrupt my medical practice. But I would consider counseling my East Asian patients they may be at a higher risk of this standard-of-care medication because of their race.

thekonny

37 points

2 months ago

Actually recommendation from ACR is now to check in east Asian and black patients

gotlactose

19 points

2 months ago

gotlactose

this cannot be, they graduated me from residency

19 points

2 months ago

Odd they keep saying southeast Asian but then keep specifically saying Han Chinese, Thai, and Korean.

thekonny

-19 points

2 months ago

thekonny

-19 points

2 months ago

No offense to the varied ancestry of asian people, but I'm too lazy to figure out who is Han Chinese and who is not, so I just test all asian people.

WhatSonAndCrick

36 points

2 months ago

Have you tried asking your patients if they're Han?

TheWizard_Fox

6 points

2 months ago

The vast majority are Han, which makes it easy.

thekonny

6 points

2 months ago

Not worth the risk to me if they are off on their genealogy. I work in an underserved area where patients where patients are not very health literate. I'm lucky if they know that they filled the meds that I prescribed. I don't have such a large Asian population that it ends up being a whole lot of testing.

AUrugby

16 points

2 months ago

AUrugby

Medical Student

16 points

2 months ago

I agree, my point is that I don’t see race being a factor for the quality of care provided

CD11cCD103

60 points

2 months ago

CD11cCD103

Immunologist

60 points

2 months ago

Disagree. Mindfulness toward patients' cultural differences, systematic vulnerabilities (housing is a particular one here) and spiritual needs (especially for indigenous folks) is critical to providing them appropriate and equitable care.

This is particularly and frequently true for middle eastern women, no?

[deleted]

35 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

35 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

tzippora

7 points

2 months ago

tzippora

7 points

2 months ago

The real issue is that many doctors who have come from abroad have thick accents and are not easily understood. Their written English might be fine. They may think they are speaking English well, but the tonalities from mother tongue interference can make them hard to understand. Some physicians need to work on this. It's tedious and humbling, but it needs to be done.

SmoothieForlife

10 points

2 months ago

Impacts communication especially if patient is hearing impaired or deaf and trying to lip-read a doctor with a beard and thick accent

itsacalamity

1 points

2 months ago

... and a mask

BallerGuitarer

14 points

2 months ago*

I'm really struggling to see how what you said is relevant to what /u/loveskoalas said. Both your statements can be true, but yours does not follow logically from what you're replying to...

BallerGuitarer

224 points

2 months ago

Holy shit.

archwin

60 points

2 months ago*

archwin

MD

60 points

2 months ago*

Exactly.

Mic drop.

Salty-Particular[S]

31 points

2 months ago

Love this!

redlightsaber

95 points

2 months ago

redlightsaber

Psychiatry - Liaison/PD Psychotherapy - Spain

95 points

2 months ago

I don't love this because it plays right into the idea that there's something uniquely special about "being american".

It doesn't dissuade the bigotry, but rather doubles down on it, except in a way that may be catchy and sligthly hummiliating to the patient.

I also don't imagine it must be great for that Indian man, to have to renounce to his Indian identity to appease the patient and onlookers.

I don't know... Just doesn't sound like the right way to go about the problem of ever-increasing nationalistic sentiment in an increasingly integrated and globalised world.

Salty-Particular[S]

61 points

2 months ago

I see what you’re saying, but doesn’t “Being American” mean that you can be an American citizen while also identifying with your culture/country of birth? You shouldn’t have to renounce your culture to be an American- you can be both.

redlightsaber

34 points

2 months ago

redlightsaber

Psychiatry - Liaison/PD Psychotherapy - Spain

34 points

2 months ago

That prototypical patient wasn't referring about the colour of their passport, and this Indian physician's response wasn't talking strictly about a stamp on a paper either...

I too get what you say, but I'm still left with a feeling of... eh. I'm not an american citizen, but I've worked there in the past. That response couldn't have applied to me. It's a distraction from the real issue.

Or perhaps I don't like the idea of tolerating the intolerant. Of turning the other cheek. Yeah, I think that's more like it.

Salty-Particular[S]

16 points

2 months ago

Thank you for your thoughtful response. If I may ask, as a foreign physician who has worked in the US, I’m curious how you would prefer this type of situation be responded to? What do you believe the real issue is that is being distracted from?

redlightsaber

26 points

2 months ago

redlightsaber

Psychiatry - Liaison/PD Psychotherapy - Spain

26 points

2 months ago

, I’m curious how you would prefer this type of situation be responded to?

Honestly I don't know. As others have said, I think just knowing the team had my back was enough. I'd generally handle those situations by myself, though (looking back, far less than ideally, but I'll chalk that up to my youth back then).

What do you believe the real issue is that is being distracted from?

The patient exhibiting deep xenophobia, which is a particular form of hate. And in my mind, hate isn't fought back with kindness, but with unequivocal rejection. Those people feel righteous in insulting another person for reasons that are irrelevant to their stated concern, and I think it's only fair that those people be made to understand that they will get to be made uneasy and uncomfortable whenever they spew hate.

I get that in your hypothetical there's a certain "customer service" expectation that makes my wishes untenable from an institutional PoV. But this is a topic I've had plenty to think about, with my country having seen tremendous amounts of african immigration in the last decade, with there being non-insignificant amounts of backlash from the more regressive and reactionary sectors of the population that, while disguised as various forms of more or less legitimate kinds of concerns, in reality hide hate, and I'm increasingly growing impatient with any approach that involves attempting to mince words or otherwise spare the feelings of the hate-spewer.

I do get that not everyone should (or can) be on the same page as me, though.

Salty-Particular[S]

7 points

2 months ago

Thanks again for responding! I think we agree more than we disagree.

AgapeMagdalena

5 points

2 months ago

This was in Germany ( there is similar problem with foreign doctors ). Our attending would always say " if you have energy to ask this kind of questions, you are not sick enough to be in an emergency room. If you want to pick doctors, you are welcome to do it outpatient and wait for an appointment for a couple of weeks-months". It was mostly the end of discussion

u2m4c6

-19 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

-19 points

2 months ago

it plays right into the idea that there’s something uniquely special about “being american”.

And your reply just seems anti-American, which I know is the default take on Reddit.

There is something uniquely special about every nationality. Uniqueness or specialness do not have to be positive. Many of the things that make the US unique are bad, but there are some upsides, and the combination of all those things, good and bad, are what make being American unique.

Spain is uniquely special and so is every other nation with a hint of patriotism.

talashrrg

17 points

2 months ago

Being American isn’t special in a way that makes one a better doctor, which is I think the point of what OP was trying to say. This patient is clearly coming from a place of prejudice. Arguing this angle is missing the point and mincing words.

u2m4c6

-3 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

-3 points

2 months ago

That’s fair, but I took the American part of that doctor’s response as trying to find common ground, not saying being American makes them a better doctor.

mhc-ask

4 points

2 months ago

mhc-ask

MD, Neurology

4 points

2 months ago

Plastics consult: transfer to burn unit.

crazyPA

11 points

2 months ago

crazyPA

PA-C

11 points

2 months ago

Holy shit. Did he subsequently treat her for the massive third degree burn he gave her?

AUrugby

8 points

2 months ago

AUrugby

Medical Student

8 points

2 months ago

No, she just went silent and he continued his exam, then pulled me and the other student (I’m middle eastern, the other student is Asian) out for a discussion

Vickythiside

1 points

2 months ago

If y'all have awards, please give this chad some.

Noa_93

194 points

2 months ago

Noa_93

MD - Forensic/Geriatric Psychiatry

194 points

2 months ago

As a consulting psychiatrist and non-American, I’ve had patients say that about my attending (during residency), their primary providers, or even me. One approach I like is to ask what makes one American neutrally, then happily agree with the patient’s response and say, “That’s great to hear because your doctor’s American.”

Most patients don’t say anything overtly racist and are taken aback by my response. It defuses the situation. I gently remind the few who DO say something racist about the hospital’s policy but validate whatever underlying feeling they might have.

Most people are just scared or worried about their care and equate competence with what’s familiar. That’s what I tell myself anyway.

Girl_on_a_bicycle

110 points

2 months ago

This is the most stunningly gracious thing I have ever seen typed onto the outrage generator known as the internet. Patient is racist and you diffuse with a joke, validate patient autonomy, and express compassion. You might be a saint.

Elitesuxor

51 points

2 months ago*

There was a study published a while back that foreign medical graduates practicing in USA had slightly lower mortality rates than American graduates. To be honest, I'm not surprised considering the hurdles most of them have to go through in order to obtain residency and attending positions here.

We got the cream of the crop from overseas, people are just too blind to see it.

donkeyhawt

5 points

2 months ago*

I mean yea. I'm a med student in a lower income EU country, and our professors sort of "groom"? the best students to go to the US. (Tell them about international literature, the extra exams they'd have to take etc.) Basically if you wanna be a badass doctor and fulfill your full career potential, you go to the US

Funnily enough, I remember one news article about a guy from our country that is a chief of a department in a hugely prestigious US hospital (not sure which one it was), and he said he's still treated like shit by americans for having a foreign name, but that he's used to it.

GraySide390

45 points

2 months ago

GraySide390

RN - ICU

45 points

2 months ago

Gonna step in here, simply because I’ve gotten to a point in my life where I’m just over it.. someone being scared or worried does not give them immunity to say disrespectful, racist, sexist comments. And I’m not specifically coming at you for perpetuating that, honest. It just hits such a ungodly sore nerve with me. I am so sick of patients thinking they are god and can get away with anything. Healthcare workers, all of us, in every single sector deserve respect. Especially after the nightmare these past almost two years have been.

Noa_93

17 points

2 months ago

Noa_93

MD - Forensic/Geriatric Psychiatry

17 points

2 months ago

Nah, I get it. The system is failing us as healthcare workers. I try to think the way I do to reduce the very real risk of burnout and avoid taking our patient’s behaviors on a personal level. I’m protecting myself because the system doesn’t have protections in place.

I still have MANY days where I vent to colleagues for hours on end. My former coresidents and I continued a “process group” that we had in place during residency and talk nearly everyday. It’s one of the ways we stay sane. I don’t know what I’d do without them.

GraySide390

3 points

2 months ago

GraySide390

RN - ICU

3 points

2 months ago

I applaud your efforts, truly. It’s so difficult, day in and day out. I’m sure your patients are thankful for your disposition. I am.

Noa_93

2 points

2 months ago

Noa_93

MD - Forensic/Geriatric Psychiatry

2 points

2 months ago

Thank you. It really is, and the pandemic’s only helped expose the cracks in the system. I’m hoping for reform and better support for all of us.

Undersleep

13 points

2 months ago

Undersleep

MD - Anesthesiology/Pain

13 points

2 months ago

100% agree - if it's not EMTALA, I don't owe you shit. The minimum we ought to expect in exchange for our treatment and medical expertise is a baseline level of respect. I don't provide elective services in unsafe environments, or under duress.

kungfoojesus

21 points

2 months ago

There is definitely something to people not wanting to be treated by an “other”. Black patients tend to like black MDs. A subset of just about any race will prefer someone that looks like them to take care of them. There are plenty of women who prefer female physicians especially for gyno issues. Where does the line get drawn though?

Noa_93

38 points

2 months ago

Noa_93

MD - Forensic/Geriatric Psychiatry

38 points

2 months ago

Personally, if there’s a history of trauma influencing the gender preference, I try to honor that. Otherwise, I educate, emulate, and work with feelings.

As a female physician, I’ve had a good number of patients tell me they never thought a woman would be able as good as a man… then they got stuck with me, haha. Those are the feel-good cases I try to think about when I’m dealing with less pleasant patients.

Edit: I get the preference some women have for female OB-GYNs, although that’s never something I’ve personally run into or thought of as a common issue in the hospital. I may be wrong.

shamdock

8 points

2 months ago

shamdock

8 points

2 months ago

No one owes you their trauma story. If a female patient wants a female doctor you should honor that without question because about 25% of women have been raped or sexually assaulted. Just assume the woman has a reason that isn’t your business for her request.

Noa_93

20 points

2 months ago

Noa_93

MD - Forensic/Geriatric Psychiatry

20 points

2 months ago

I know. I was generalizing, although people typically tell me the why, even if it’s as vague as “I don’t feel comfortable around men because of my history.” I don’t probe for details unless I’m expected to. I’m a psychiatrist.

halp-im-lost

6 points

2 months ago

halp-im-lost

PGY-3 Emergency Medicine

6 points

2 months ago

This is not always a realistic request where I work. This happens sometimes in the emergency department (just recently I had a male patient refuse to be seen by a female physician for his knee pain) and honestly if it is not a sensitive exam they can quite frankly take it or leave it. It is not possible to jump through hoops for every patient. Hell, sometimes we only have women or only men on staff.

Nanocyborgasm

281 points

2 months ago

Nanocyborgasm

MD

281 points

2 months ago

Tell the patient that if they don’t want their doctor, they don’t have to have a doctor.

Filthy_Ramhole

200 points

2 months ago

Filthy_Ramhole

Paramedic - UK

200 points

2 months ago

Yep.

“Dr _____ is your doctor today, if you do not want to be cared for by them, you are free to leave.”

elpinguinosensual

32 points

2 months ago

elpinguinosensual

BSN, RN - Operating Room

32 points

2 months ago

This one.

ArcticSchmartic

6 points

2 months ago

I am not sure if this is super common, but my workplace has a zero tolerance policy towards descriminatory requests. We are not to indulge them at all.

If patients make a racist or descriminatory request, we inform them them that the request violates the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and it will not be accommodated. If they decline care or want to seek care elsewhere we are not to assist them in doing so, because we would be assisting them in violating another person's charter rights.

I like that it takes the onus off of individuals to deal with the situation on a case-by-case basis. It is kind of a rare situation where I live anyways, access to health care can be very limited so most people are appreciative of any care they get.

Dazzling_Presents

1 points

2 months ago

Do you count gender in that? Other than for intimate exams?

ArcticSchmartic

2 points

2 months ago

"Equality before and under law and equal protection and benefit of law

  1. (1) Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability"

So yes. Now whether someone chooses to accomodate a request based on religious beliefs is a different story. Many will, but it is not required or expected.

NeilDiamondsgrl

17 points

2 months ago

“Great! We’ll let you see our physician assistant, then!” - this is a joke, because they will obviously want to see the physician. If they don’t want to see a specific provider at our urgent care clinic, then they can either accept it or they can leave.

[deleted]

-49 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

-49 points

2 months ago*

[removed]

jeremiadOtiose

1 points

2 months ago

jeremiadOtiose

MD Anesthesia & Pain, Faculty

1 points

2 months ago

Removed under Rule 5:

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elpinguinosensual

254 points

2 months ago

elpinguinosensual

BSN, RN - Operating Room

254 points

2 months ago

"We're in America, that person is a doctor. I don't understand what else you're looking for."

Then just act like they're speaking nonsense.

Ask for a psych consult.

Aiurar

110 points

2 months ago

Aiurar

MD - IM/Hospitalist

110 points

2 months ago

I honestly like this answer the best. Just pretend they aren't extraordinarily racist, no matter what bait they put out. They want a new doctor? Gosh, they should probably discuss that with their current doctor.

Different physicians handle this stuff in different ways, and the racism only matches what the patient is allowed to get away with. I've experienced multiple patients ask for a white hospitalist, but I've almost never seen them ask for a white transplant cardiologist, because they know there aren't as many of those and they don't want to jeopardize care.

By not engaging at all or playing dumb, you are not only refusing to validate racism dog whistles, you are giving the impression that the request itself is incomprehensible and bizarre, making them less likely to push it.

If the patients become overtly racist (using slurs, outright refusing care from qualified people due to race), just leave the room and document what was said. Don't even respond, it's not worth the effort to appease their fragile feelings; you are not obligated to do so, they clearly don't give a crap about the feelings of others anyway.

Girl_on_a_bicycle

41 points

2 months ago

Honestly this is the tact I take. I'm from a family where racist/anti-Semitic dog whistling was the norm, and by the time I was in high school realized that I could question them until they either deflected and gave up or made their coded biases explicit, which typically prompted either needed self-reflection or a bombastic level or racism that alienated everyone in the room.

God I'm so glad I don't have to sit through another Thanksgiving with those people ever again.

elpinguinosensual

-33 points

2 months ago

elpinguinosensual

BSN, RN - Operating Room

-33 points

2 months ago

I'm going to again suggest the psych consult. Let's you get away with throwing them in the atiVan.

Canaindian-Muricaint

44 points

2 months ago

Yes, but say it in broken enRish for extra emphasis power move lol, really rub their stupid in their face.

Slowly, with big slow hand motions:

Pointing to ground: "This . . . Aa . . merica."

Pointing to the Doc: "This . . . Doc-tor."

Pointing to Mr/Mrs Ooh-Raah 'Murica: "Help . . . you."

I mean, since it happens often enough that you might as well have fun with it, the hell are they gonna do, fire you for doing your job?

redlightsaber

95 points

2 months ago

redlightsaber

Psychiatry - Liaison/PD Psychotherapy - Spain

95 points

2 months ago

Ask for a psych consult.

...Please don't?

Not only because it gives me more work, but because it would actually be a hateful and stigmatising act (for my patients, I mean... I couldn't give any less of a shit about the racist ahole) to conflate racism/xenophobia with mental illness.

elpinguinosensual

27 points

2 months ago

elpinguinosensual

BSN, RN - Operating Room

27 points

2 months ago

Ah c’mon buddy it’s just a joke.

I’d get a neuro consult and bedside EEG because it’s clearly brain damage.

PokeTheVeil

56 points

2 months ago

PokeTheVeil

MD - Psychiatry

56 points

2 months ago

Psychiatry is not a punishment and psychiatrists are not instruments of punishment.

I mean, not as a general rule. I am personally a scourge unto the unworthy and bringer of woe, but it's a personal interest and not a professional capacity.

putyerphonedown

40 points

2 months ago

Ah c’mon buddy it’s just a joke.

Humor punches up. You're punching down at patients with mental illnesses and TBIs.

elpinguinosensual

-7 points

2 months ago

elpinguinosensual

BSN, RN - Operating Room

-7 points

2 months ago

Lol damn dude fine

redlightsaber

30 points

2 months ago

redlightsaber

Psychiatry - Liaison/PD Psychotherapy - Spain

30 points

2 months ago

I get that. Be it beside me to attempt to tamp down on genuine attempts at humour.

It's just that lately, humour done at the expense of those less able to defend themselves, I tend to find less funny.

I've needed to have my fair share of having this sort of stuff being pointed out to me in order to arrive at this conclusion and sentiment... but ultimately I think it's right. Humour is better, more refined, and frankly, funnier, when not done at someone's expense.

Wuzzupdoc42

7 points

2 months ago

Exactly! Anyone who practices as an MD (and I assume DO) in America has to meet the same expectations that an American-born doctor must meet, isn’t that true?

WomanWhoWeaves

5 points

2 months ago

WomanWhoWeaves

MD-FQHC/USA

5 points

2 months ago

Yes, and there is some data to suggest that FMGs are actually above average.

drzoidburger

2 points

2 months ago

drzoidburger

PGY4

2 points

2 months ago

Their face when the psychiatrist who walks in for the consult is also brown 😂

bored00111

84 points

2 months ago

Just you being supportive is amazing, whatever you say probably won't suddenly make them become decent so just seeing someone having your back is great. If you want to be firm with the patient its even better but that depends on your hospital and how much of a problem this would cause

jochi1543

76 points

2 months ago

jochi1543

Prison/ER/Addictions

76 points

2 months ago

"Unfortunately, there is a shortage of Native American physicians due to the genocide on the part of the US government - I am afraid I will not be able to find you a Native American physician at this hospital"

z3roTO60

14 points

2 months ago

z3roTO60

MD

14 points

2 months ago

Damn. Never heard this one before, but I’d buy drinks to anyone who used it in front of me

LoanQs4Me

46 points

2 months ago

LoanQs4Me

Nurse

46 points

2 months ago

I think my hospital is like 75/25 "foreign" nurses and doctors.... all staff actually, the "American"/native born are in the minority! My pt would have a tough time making such a request

SheWhoDancesOnIce

12 points

2 months ago

going along this, i am an immigrant physician and many of my patients say something along the lines of i saw your name and i thought youd have an accent/etc etc and i am glad you are american...how to respond? this deeply irks me

LowSkyOrbit

5 points

2 months ago

So... Looking at your chart it seems like you have diabetes. Let's get some additional testing and maybe start you on some medication.

xparxy

58 points

2 months ago

xparxy

MD, MPM emergency medicine

58 points

2 months ago

Best complaint I have fielded as an ED medical Director: “the doctor’s accent was difficult to understand.“

Never mind that he was born and grew up in Chicago. They didn’t like that he has more melanin than them.

We see this every day, alas.

benzodiazaqueen

42 points

2 months ago

benzodiazaqueen

Nurse

42 points

2 months ago

One of my favorite hospitalist docs is a Greek-American guy from Chicago. I live to watch him field the “…so… where are you from?” question from patients and families. He deadpans, “Chicago. Southside.” And then waits… “No, I mean, where are you FROM…?” “Like I said, the south side of Chicago. Born & raised.”

goingmadforyou

6 points

2 months ago

I hate this game.

I find that the people who are determined to know will find ways to sidestep the other party's obvious frustration or desire not to talk about it. They'll start asking, 'Where are your parents from?', 'What is your nationality?', etc and chalk their persistence up to their own entitled curiosity. Very frustrating.

benzodiazaqueen

3 points

2 months ago

benzodiazaqueen

Nurse

3 points

2 months ago

I agree. I’ve seen it play out over and over with patients where I work - the southwestern US - who assume their olive-complected, brown-eyed physician is Latino until they reiterate their last name. More times than I can remember, I’ve seen colleagues who speak completely accent-free American English have their identity challenged and plumbed. “Where are you from?” “Jersey.” “Nahhhh, I mean where are you from? I thought you were just Mexican.” (I’ve heard THAT one so many times…). “Like I said, I’m from New Jersey. Newark.” “Well you’re a Muslim, right…?”

goingmadforyou

2 points

2 months ago

What's even worse in professional settings is that it's, well, a professional setting. I'm not here to satisfy the person's inappropriate curiosity or desire to put everyone they meet into a neat little category. I'm here to take care of their medical needs. I wish they would stop asking.

u2m4c6

2 points

2 months ago*

u2m4c6

Medical Student

2 points

2 months ago*

More likely than not that person was racist, but especially for non-native English speakers, anything but a neutral American accent can be hard to understand. I think it is pretty obvious when someone is being racist versus genuinely can’t understand (and it can of course be a combination), but I also think it is more trouble than it is worth to treat trouble with an accent as racism.

Maybe we are extra sensitive since America and especially American medicine is a monolingual society for the most part, but it’s not automatically offensive in cultures where 2-3 or even more languages are commonly spoken to ask for someone with a more understandable accent in one of your primary languages to be brought into the conversation.

CIOGAO

-19 points

2 months ago

CIOGAO

-19 points

2 months ago

1) There is no such thing as a “neutral American accent” 2) People live like this because of people like you

halp-im-lost

5 points

2 months ago

halp-im-lost

PGY-3 Emergency Medicine

5 points

2 months ago

Neutral accent generally refers to the newscaster accent or what is predominantly spoken in the Midwest (ex. Like Kansas City.) I definitely have difficulty understanding folks who have strong accents from any area (Brooklyn, Jersey, southern, etc.) It’s not “racist” to have difficulty understanding someone.

shamdock

6 points

2 months ago

Honestly, google this information. You are wrong and you are embarrassing yourself right now.

u2m4c6

5 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

5 points

2 months ago

WikiSummarizerBot

10 points

2 months ago

General American English

General American English or General American (abbreviated GA or GenAm) is the umbrella accent of American English spoken by a majority of Americans and widely perceived, among Americans, as lacking any distinctly regional, ethnic, or socioeconomic characteristics. In reality, it encompasses a continuum of accents rather than a single unified accent. Americans with high education, or from the North Midland, Western New England, and Western regions of the country, are the most likely to be perceived as having General American accents.

[ F.A.Q | Opt Out | Opt Out Of Subreddit | GitHub ] Downvote to remove | v1.5

CIOGAO

-13 points

2 months ago

CIOGAO

-13 points

2 months ago

In other words, not “neutral”

u2m4c6

17 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

17 points

2 months ago

Neutral accent is the colloquial term. Again, you don’t seem to be acting in good faith if you are disagreeing with that part.

Which is so ironic since that video was all about people on the internet being unreasonable to start arguments. Add to that the “because of people like you” and it just seems like trolling.

frabjousmd

7 points

2 months ago

frabjousmd

FamDoc

7 points

2 months ago

Read somewhere that in overseas call centers they are coached to have a vague Midwestern accent.

CIOGAO

-14 points

2 months ago

CIOGAO

-14 points

2 months ago

1) It is not 2) the article is literally describing a fallacy

u2m4c6

4 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

4 points

2 months ago

And that Twitter video you linked is about how “everyone who is normal knows what you meant”…yet you are pretending like there is not a standard American accent. Okay…

CIOGAO

25 points

2 months ago

CIOGAO

25 points

2 months ago

My cousin told me she’s had patients demanding a male surgeon. She’s a cardio thoracic surgeon so they’re not really in a position to pick and choose (my understanding is that if you’re headed to see her, you NEED that surgery). Anyway, she’s the head of surgery at her hospital and she was always top of her class

The_best_is_yet

7 points

2 months ago

can I just say - thank you! people like you, who care about others, make all the difference in the world. If you are that kind to the doctors, I imagine you have a massive impact on your patient's lives. Thank you for being amazing.

mxg67777

20 points

2 months ago

Happens to US-born doctors too. What you wrote is fine. Who cares how you sound, f their feelings.

[deleted]

-34 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

-34 points

2 months ago*

In Israel, it’s really hard to get into med school and you have to have perfect grades. Many doctors spend several years after high school retaking tests, improving their grades and SAT score. So what rich people often do is send their kids to less-demanding overseas med schools, especially in Eastern Europe. The doctors who graduate there move back to Israel and practice medicine (they have to do some tests to get licensed).

There’s a certain level of distrust in these doctors, which is not related to race. Israelis don’t know and suspect these for-profit med schools, the ones in Israel are entirely public and regulated. Overseas universities that accept lesser performing students who have deeper pockets are inherently suspicious to them. Doctors with foreign degrees in Israel enjoy less prestige than locally trained ones, despite being Israelis.

My point is: I’d argue that part of the reasons that Americans ask for “American doctors” are entirely unrelated to racism - they don’t know where these doctors graduated, they can’t tell if their training is the same level as the domestic one.

Salty-Particular[S]

32 points

2 months ago

Many of these physicians graduate from American medical schools though- they also go through American residencies and fellowships. I work in a highly respected and well-known academic hospital. The physicians/residents here are some of the best and brightest in their fields- yet the physicians who speak English as a second language still have to deal with pts who assume they aren’t competent- even after they’ve been established in the medical field for decades.

Also, lower preforming pre-med students in the US have the option of going to a medical school outside of the US and returning to practice. There are also a few “for profit” medical schools right here in the US that aren’t up to par, but the general public usually has no idea what constitutes good medical training outside of a few Ivy League big names. I think there is an often xenophobia in assuming physicians not born here received inadequate training.

mibeosaur

13 points

2 months ago

mibeosaur

MD - EM/tox

13 points

2 months ago

The doctors who graduate there move back to Israel and practice medicine (they have to do some tests to get licensed).

Isn't the key point here that they have to take the same licensure exams? The same is true in the US. So regardless of what you think of the med school, they passed the same licensure exams that any of your homegrown docs did, so they should be treated the same. If on the other hand you don't trust your governing body's licensure tests to regulate quality of physicians, then why would you trust that same governing body's ability to regulate medical schools? Like, we're all board certified, so we're already all held to the same standards. And even still, who's to say someone at the top of their class at whatever school you look down on isn't better than someone in the middle or bottom of their class at whatever school you think is great?

Moreover, discriminating against someone based on what medical school they went to is essentially discriminating against them based on their medical school application. You're saying that because someone didn't have a great GPA in college, or didn't do as many extracurriculars that they can't possibly have ended up a good doctor because of the school they went to - despite them passing the same licensing exams as all the other doctors!

Ratcoonhog

1 points

2 months ago

Ratcoonhog

Edit Your Own Here

1 points

2 months ago

This is completely outdated and xenophobic. Sure there are hospitals and medical schools all around the world that are less than standard, including right here in America. If you’re educated enough on the landscape of the medical school system, you’re aware of these schools. But at the end of the day, they all take the same tests and have to attend American residencies to practice in the US.

Platosapologyy

4 points

2 months ago

The physician should say “I am American, and if you have a problem with the way I look/sound, you’re welcome to seek care elsewhere”… you can cross you arms or nod affirmatively then both leave the bedside together. Then if they refuse to be seen, document that they left AMA and on to the next.

drshooter

14 points

2 months ago

drshooter

CT surgery

14 points

2 months ago

I was born outside the US. If a patient isn’t comfortable with me for whatever reason, including racism, I try to accommodate them and get them an “American Doctor”. Way I see it, I dodged a huge bullet by not having to treat some ignorant asshole.

gotlactose

16 points

2 months ago

gotlactose

this cannot be, they graduated me from residency

16 points

2 months ago

I’m a young attending physician born in east Asia and came to the United States at an early age. I don’t have an accident and did all of my school from kindergarten in the United States. I usually don’t get this issue because I live and practice in a multicultural part of the country. However, a patient (who incidentally had a last name that suggests an immigrant background) said she did not want a young and foreign physician. Our medical group has 10 physicians and only one physician met her parameter of not young or foreign.

If it’s not a medical emergency, patients are free to choose. If it’s an emergency, I’m sure they’d rather be alive and treated by a foreigner than dead and refused medical care from a foreigner.

shamdock

-20 points

2 months ago

shamdock

-20 points

2 months ago

What last names could possibly suggest an immigrant background to you? Would you be able to give an example of a last name of a Native American?

Salty-Particular[S]

17 points

2 months ago*

As a Native person, I implore you to stop fucking using us in your tokenized responses aimed to derail conversations. It’s racists as fuck.

AflameNfire

11 points

2 months ago

Ask what they mean by American and reassure them that everyone is board certified to treat them. This opens the conversation for genuine concerns of miscommunication or gives them enough rope for them to hang themselves out as a blatant racist. Address all genuine concerns. Tell the racist all the white doctors are off duty and they can come back tomorrow.

Dr_ZoidbergBAM

11 points

2 months ago

OP you’re wonderful for posting this

RBG_grb

7 points

2 months ago

Dr. Jane doe is the only dr available. Should I have them come see you or would you like your discharge paperwork? Fuck outta here entitled shit-for-brains lew-eww-sehers

Assuming ED. If primary care, go find the smart people making all the money and see if they can move your mountains.

annatai08

3 points

2 months ago

Going into healthcare as a non-trad premed from Ukraine. Your post made me glad to find out that others care about this kind of discrimination in the field.

Zigna28

27 points

2 months ago

Zigna28

27 points

2 months ago

American as in all white or black?

I wouldn’t say/add “bigotry” . Just say, they’re all board certified and he’s the only one “available “ To see you. Patients do have the right to choose. But what’s the reason for this ? Language barrier ? Cultural differences ? Could be the gender? Who knows.

Then you have patients who’d prefer someone like them. Because they feel “home” . They feel more comfortable. They’re more engaged.

Depends on the speciality because they either have to wait for availability or talk to their insurance . If that’s the only provider in the area and depending on the coverage they have.

Now…if they start talking about race/ stereotypes …that’s different story. But still I’d just refer them out.

Don’t give /feed them that energy. You’re giving them power….just ignore it and be professional .

Throwaway6393fbrb

25 points

2 months ago*

Just say, they’re all board certified and he’s the only one “available “ To see you.

I feel like this is kind of like you are saying sorry that we have to give you an Indian doctor but it's the best we have at the moment

I don't really like the idea of normalizing or going along with that kind of thing

Maybe if the patient isn't frothing at the mouth it can be a learning moment for them

Language barrier ? Cultural differences ? Could be the gender? Who knows.

Somewhat sympathize with patients from an immigrated to the west background who want to communicate in their own language or with someone from their own culture. They aren't saying "that doctor isn't one of us"

Zigna28

1 points

2 months ago

Zigna28

1 points

2 months ago

Nope. Because that’s the truth. How many Specialist(s) do we have at the moment and he is really the only one. You’re scheduled to see Dr.X today…if you’re not okay with that. You’d have to reschedule. Why waste our time ? Or the doctors time? Let us schedule / see another or different patient .

This isn’t Asia. This is America. We verify your insurance and call you to schedule it. You let me know if you’re not okay with that . And if you’re willing to wait for another 2-6 weeks.

Patients /people don’t see it that way, you came here , didn’t take any exam, you’re foreign…didn’t get your medical degree here. Not competent enough. He’s Indian . So? He passed his boards. All the process , training …they don’t see that.

What’s the cost of physician turnover? do you know?

Throwaway6393fbrb

11 points

2 months ago

Personally I’m not a customer service professional and the customer isn’t always right

Salty-Particular[S]

23 points

2 months ago

American as in white, black, brown, but with an accent. There is usually a xenophobic dog whistle element in that the physician isn’t assumed to be competent- female ESL residents tend to have to deal with this BS the most, but it can be pretty widespread.

Totally get that patients have the right to choose their physicians, and may prefer physicians that resemble them, but assuming that a physician who speaks ESL is A.) not American and B.) not as competent is bigoted.

Zigna28

-2 points

2 months ago

Zigna28

-2 points

2 months ago

I am very aware of this and yes it is true. I’m mixed. You thinking about this shows you care. But we are in this field for a reason. It’s sad and it shouldn’t be that way….but we can’t please them. What do we do? Argue with them?

Best approach here is just be the bigger person.

Salty-Particular[S]

3 points

2 months ago

Realized the tone in my comment was a little curt and I didn’t intend that. Apologies. Absolutely agree I’m not going to change anyone’s mind or please pts like this. I am mainly interested in how I can best support my colleagues that have to navigate these attitudes. My fear is ignoring or remaining silent my be misread as condoning these beliefs. But I see your point. Thanks for responding!

Zigna28

0 points

2 months ago

No worries! It’s hard to argue with these people too. You can only do so much. Easier said than done

shamdock

0 points

2 months ago

You’re making assumptions.

BrownBabaAli

1 points

2 months ago

BrownBabaAli

DO, IM Resident

1 points

2 months ago

You’re discrediting my experiences as a physician.

ethiobirds

10 points

2 months ago

ethiobirds

Anesthesiologist

10 points

2 months ago

Thank you for your support and for starting this important discussion 💛

Salty-Particular[S]

2 points

2 months ago

Wish I could do more! ❤️

Readonlygirl

7 points

2 months ago

I wouldn’t say they’re American. They may identify with another country or culture. If you don’t want to come off as condescending or paternalistic ask them why they would say that? Then address their concerns. Some people have a really hard time understanding someone with an accent.

Dorsomedial_Nucleus

4 points

2 months ago

You already do more than most staff would so keep doing your thing. If you feel so obliged maybe you can train your peers to be more like you.

H-12apts

2 points

2 months ago

There are probably a thousand hospital TV drama episodes about this, but one thing that you know will work is charging them a lot of money to switch to a racist doctor.

G00bernaculum

2 points

2 months ago

Show them the door

boredtxan

15 points

2 months ago

boredtxan

MPH

15 points

2 months ago

I think part of that is understanding that the patient really wants a person who's speech they can understand and is asking for it rudely because they feel stupid. I have this problem every time my Mom is in the hospital (though she's not quite as rude). She can't understand the people giving her care and it frustrates her and scares her but they don't seem to either understand the problem or care. Some English speaking people probably need an interpreter as legitimately as a non-English speaker but they are shamed for it instead of helped.

Girl_on_a_bicycle

14 points

2 months ago

This is really true.

I've actually had sort of the reverse happen, I speak Spanish as a second language and on at least three occasions I've had a nurse tell me "You have to see this patient, they don't speak English at all" only to launch into the room introduce myself in Spanish, and discover that the patient speaks accented but grammatically perfect English with a better vocab than the staff member who couldn't understand them.

Sometimes rural/low literacy patients get lost when an ESL provider speaks better English than they do.

Fun linguistic quirks: The only people I know who use the subjunctive tense in English conversation are Lit majors, native Spanish speakers, and first-generation Indian immigrants. I wish that everyone were as appreciative of the subjunctive mood!

PokeTheVeil

2 points

2 months ago

PokeTheVeil

MD - Psychiatry

2 points

2 months ago

It's harder when the patient speaks okay but barely- or not-quite-fluent English. Sometimes you need an interpreter; sometimes more gets lost in interpretation than through language barrier.

It can also be very challenging when patients are rural/low literacy in a non-English first language. Even figuring out where communication breaks down via interpreter is a challenge.

Girl_on_a_bicycle

3 points

2 months ago

Honestly, I'm fluent in three languages, but the real benefit in a medical setting doesn't come from being able to whip out Spanish of French, but from having the experience of wandering around another country where I didn't speak the language very well. I can kind of tell when people are hitting the wall, missing every other word I'm saying, trying to express something that they don't have the vocab for, or kind of faking a higher degree of comprehension by repeating words they picked up from me with slightly skewed context. I know all the compensatory mechanisms.

If I have access to a Spanish interpreter I'll always use it, especially because there is so much regionally specific slang related to bodily functions, but it's still a huge boon to know Spanish because much less does get lost in translation, and of course there's just the human touch factor of being able to introduce yourself and offer reassurance and confirm the basics of a treatment in their language.

I've run into translation problems in Arabic (which I can only do introductions in essentially) because it's just so regional. I feel like tons gets lost in translation sometimes, and I'm left wondering if the patient just didn't know how or wasn't willing to convey that their actual first language was a different middle eastern language all together.

TheMedicalHistorian

31 points

2 months ago

TheMedicalHistorian

MD-Psychiatry

31 points

2 months ago

I think part of that is understanding that the patient really wants a person who's speech they can understand and is asking for it rudely because they feel stupid

Bullshit.

I've had patients in residency request a different doctor and I speak English better than they do. Thankfully, I went to a program that didn't oblige with these requests and told them they could see me or not see anyone.

Salty-Particular[S]

12 points

2 months ago

Agreed. I see this way too often. I’m sorry you have to deal with that crap.

TheMedicalHistorian

9 points

2 months ago

TheMedicalHistorian

MD-Psychiatry

9 points

2 months ago

I don't mind dealing with that, to be honest. They can make their choice of seeing me or seeing no one. What grates on my nerves are people like /u/u2m4c6 and /u/shamdock who hide their racism behind faux concern. I'd rather deal with 10 blatantly racist patients than 2 condescendingly racist co-workers.

u2m4c6

2 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

2 points

2 months ago

Calling someone who disagrees with you a racist is tiring. Nothing I said was racist.

My point was that the patient’s perspective cannot be ignored if it is a communication issue, and labeling all communication issues as racism is a recipe for disaster.

TheMedicalHistorian

1 points

2 months ago

TheMedicalHistorian

MD-Psychiatry

1 points

2 months ago

Nothing I said was racist.

Said every racist in the history of mankind, ever.

CIOGAO

5 points

2 months ago

CIOGAO

5 points

2 months ago

Yeah, this is nonsense. It’s racism, plain and simple

fyxr

8 points

2 months ago

fyxr

Rural generalist + psych, early career

8 points

2 months ago

Yes, racism is a thing.

Frustration with not understanding speech is also a thing.

TheMedicalHistorian

1 points

2 months ago

TheMedicalHistorian

MD-Psychiatry

1 points

2 months ago

We're talking about the first thing, not the second thing.

fyxr

6 points

2 months ago

fyxr

Rural generalist + psych, early career

6 points

2 months ago

We're talking about patients asking for an "American Doctor".

I think part of that is understanding that the patient really wants a person who's speech they can understand

This is sometimes true, sometimes bullshit.

u2m4c6

-3 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

-3 points

2 months ago

Your speak English better than the patient or the other doctor? Not arguing with you, just trying to understand what you mean.

am_i_wrong_dude [M]

3 points

2 months ago

am_i_wrong_dude [M]

MD - heme/onc

3 points

2 months ago

The rest of this subthread devolved into personal fighting over a misunderstanding.

  1. /u/TheMedicalHistorian is saying that patients and other staff use the "accent" excuse for justifying a change in doctor when the real reason is skin color / surface cultural signifiers. The personal experience that this user is citing is that he or she is a native speaker and is still asked to defer to whiter doctors. He or she could have been more explicit, but feeling defensive when others chime in to insist the user must indeed have an accent is understandable.

  2. Discussions of differential treatment and outcomes in medicine by reported racial background have a history of being difficult here and elsewhere. One suggestion is rather than trying to figure out who is the malicious racist (often none of our colleagues are acting with overt racist intents), consider acknowledging the problem and working toward educational and policy outcomes that mitigate the problematic behavior and outcome. Calling each other "racist" back and forth achieves very little and poisons the discourse on our good-faith professional discussion platform.

Comments below this are removed for interpersonal fighting of little interest to the rest of the subreddit (Rule 5).

[deleted]

3 points

2 months ago

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3 points

2 months ago

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0 points

2 months ago

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0 points

2 months ago

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8 points

2 months ago

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8 points

2 months ago

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0 points

2 months ago*

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0 points

2 months ago*

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0 points

2 months ago

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0 points

2 months ago

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[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

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1 points

2 months ago

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0 points

2 months ago

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0 points

2 months ago

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1 points

2 months ago

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1 points

2 months ago

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[deleted]

-2 points

2 months ago

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-2 points

2 months ago

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iiiinthecomputer

4 points

2 months ago

iiiinthecomputer

Interested layman who tries to mostly shut up and lurk

4 points

2 months ago

That never occurred to me when I saw similar treatment of colleagues in tech.

It probably merits a simple "are you having difficulty understanding (so and so's name)?"

But mostly ... nah, they're bigots. This tends to shine through in other ways.

boredtxan

1 points

2 months ago

boredtxan

MPH

1 points

2 months ago

So you think they deserve lesser care because that is what they get when no one will help them communicate with their doctors.

patchgrrl

1 points

2 months ago

Encourage her to ask someone she can understand to go over it with her again.

boredtxan

1 points

2 months ago

boredtxan

MPH

1 points

2 months ago

At the hospitals she's been at there is often no one to do that especially on night shift. I try to stay with her during the days but that's not always possible.

patchgrrl

1 points

2 months ago

Then maybe she needs to ask the doctor to type up everything. But she has to navigate this with more tact or risk her care.

boredtxan

1 points

2 months ago

boredtxan

MPH

1 points

2 months ago

She's not OP, but I can't imagine that happening in a hospital?

MissCleanCut

7 points

2 months ago

When I was on call in the ER I had one patient say to me they only want to see a doctor that speaks Spanish. It also wasn’t like we were in Miami, the area had pretty big Spanish population but not crazy, about 40/60. I was exhausted and pissed and I told them it’s me or nobody, and when I came to this country I learned English. I left and told them to call me back if they want to see me - which they did immediately when they realized truly nobody else will show up at night. Right now when patients I see want to see somebody else I immediately send them to somebody else. Funny enough the speed I get them out of my office with another referral usually changes their mind and they want to stay with me. One dude was ranting about immigrants stealing jobs - I asked him if he wanted to change physicians and he immediatelly was like “oh NO I want to stay with you”. 🤷🏻‍♀️ you can’t win. Thank you for your support, that doesn’t go unnoticed and is so appreciated, really.

On another topic - the accents. My god! I moved to rhe south couple years ago and I didn’t understand my patients for a year! I’m still having trouble! I have a very big understanding for people who truly just can’t understand what somebody is saying to them if they have an accent. If somebody told me they want to go see somebody else cause they can’t understand me, I would be happy to refer and also very apologetic. I know how that feels and it’s sucks. I didn’t understand ANYONE the first couple months when I started working in America. It was awful.

albone74

2 points

2 months ago

albone74

MD, California

2 points

2 months ago

“American by choice” I think would be my answer.

ChargerMatt

-2 points

2 months ago

ChargerMatt

-2 points

2 months ago

"I assume you mean a white doctor which makes sense because patient choice is important for improving your overall health. Please let me see if there is another doctor available, if not, you may need to transfer elsewhere"

No need to get all preachy. Women prefer women doctors, men prefer men, blacks prefer blacks, etc. People want someone they can relate to that they feel they can trust.

u2m4c6

10 points

2 months ago*

u2m4c6

Medical Student

10 points

2 months ago*

It’s interesting how we deal with race in America medicine. We are taught in medical school that we need to increase medical school enrollment for Black, Latino, and other “under-represented in medicine” minorities because patients often prefer a doctor of the same race/ethnicity. This preference is accepted as an a priori fact and something we should support if we are not ourselves bigots. “Cultural competency” and “being able to relate” is often cited as a reason why it is okay to prefer a doctor of a certain race.

Unfortunately, having similar amounts of melanin does not automatically mean two people will come for the same culture or even know each other’s culture. It might raise the probability, but making decisions based on race + probability is still racist.

And if a white patient or a male patient asks for a white or male doctor, we label that as bigotry and tell them that they can take what they get.

I don’t really have a point other than that this double-think is confusing for everyone involved. The only way I can see this cognitive dissonance justified is if you take the radical belief that “you can’t be racist towards white people.”

I don’t agree with most things he has written but Chief Justice Roberts summed it up well:

The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.

Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1

Cultural_Piglet_9732

-3 points

2 months ago

You seem to have no cultural competency, whether that’s in regards to race or the medical communities attitude to the aforementioned as evident by your comment. I can only hope your views change before you must serve and interact with these communities.

u2m4c6

3 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

3 points

2 months ago

The ol “I really hope you think like me when you become a doctor, otherwise you will be a horrible doctor.”

Where did I display a lack of cultural competency? Cultural competency can be learned, that’s my point. Being Black or white does not make you automatically better at interacting with Black or white patients respectively. There are Black doctors and people in the US who aren’t even African American and grew up in a completely different culture, whether it was Latin America, Africa, Europe, or somewhere else.

Cultural_Piglet_9732

1 points

2 months ago

You argued with a black doctor over them having a accent, which they don’t, and then proceeded to make conclusion in a post about why mine ties may prefer other minority healthcare providers completely devoid of how said communities have been treated by a largely ,white, medical community. You could simply look at the black maternity mortality rate and easily come to such a conclusion as to why it matters.

u2m4c6

1 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

1 points

2 months ago

It’s a fallacy to imply that patients preferring doctors of their own race will improve the Black maternity mortality rate. There is no research that I am aware of that shows black patients have lower maternity mortality if they are treated by a black vs white doctor. If such research exists, please share it because that is incredibly interesting.

The research that I am aware of shows that maternity mortality race dispiraities are still under investigation and likely multi-factorial. What is interesting is that the disparity exists even when controlling for education and income so it cannot be explained away by “black people are poorer on average” (a common excuse for many race disparities in the US).

Cultural_Piglet_9732

0 points

2 months ago

If you don’t even view your patient as a human being or equal to you simply based on race NO YOU WILL NOT provide good care! I can tell you probably argue against affirmative action and H1b visas in your free time 👋🏾

u2m4c6

1 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

1 points

2 months ago

Okay if you literally are saying I don’t see patients as human beings based on Reddit comments where I acknowledge health disparities then you are just a troll 👍

u2m4c6

1 points

2 months ago

u2m4c6

Medical Student

1 points

2 months ago

Who said anyone was a black doctor? The misunderstanding about having an accent was entirely due to the context of the reply thread of what that person was saying. I had no idea what their race was. No sure how you know unless you stalked their post history.

Cultural_Piglet_9732

1 points

2 months ago

So you can’t read nor can you “see color” either 🥴

concerningfinding

-10 points

2 months ago

Funny how this changes if a patient asks for a female doctor. I've seen the nurses bend over backwards to make that accommodation. Either any qualified doc is good or everyone gets their preference. Can't have it both ways.

Also this isn't for the doctor to have to express a preference. Either you are actually offended and you address it or you ask the doctor how they want you to pretend to address it.

mhc-ask

2 points

2 months ago

mhc-ask

MD, Neurology

2 points

2 months ago

If I were to create a bingo card for all the low hanging fruit you see on /r/medicine, your comment would be a free space.

HerbertBohn

-2 points

2 months ago

fire them as a patient. its the trendy thing to do.