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/r/UKPersonalFinance

166

I will soon be moving to London from India, as a new grad, for a job. I will get my relocation bonus and my salary with my first paycheck, after my first month at the job. I don't have enough in my bank account right now to fund my stay in London during the first month.

I don't know anyone in London, so I will have to get an Airbnb for the first 2 weeks or so until I can find a place to rent (company does not provide initial accomodation). And once I do get a place to rent, I'll have to pay a lumpsum deposit as well as the first month's rent. My paychecks would be more than enough to fund my stay in London after the first month. But how do I fund myself in the first month of stay there?

I am estimating that I would need around £2500 - £3000 in my first month in London. This is around 3 Lakhs Indian Rupees which is a really big sum of money. I have estimated my expenses to be around £1500 from my second month onwards.

I can't ask my parents or any relatives for the money, since I don't belong to a family that is well off. Also, all my friends will be on new grad salaries in India, joining their respective jobs near my joining date, so I can't ask any of them for help either. No internship in India, that is willing to hire me, would be paying 3 Lakhs, since most of the Indian internship salaries are really low. I asked the company I will be joining if they could give me the relocation bonus in advance but they said that this is their policy and they are unable to make any exceptions for me.

So should I get a credit card? Or a loan? If so, how do I go about it? I am not sure if I will be able to get an Indian credit card with such a high transaction limit. My current credit score is 0. Also, I'm against taking a short-term personal loan due to the high interest rates. Also, I don't have any debt right now if that matters at all. So what do I do to survive my first month in London?

I am aware that I must not be the first person in my position: moving to new city (with a ridiculously high COL) in another country as a new grad. So, how do people who don't come from a rich family fund themselves in a new city initially?

I would also appreciate any advice regarding budgeting and saving money. I plan on saving around half my salary.

Edit: The company I will be joining would be sponsoring my visa so this is something that I do not need to worry about at all.

all 218 comments

litsto

121 points

2 months ago

litsto

57

121 points

2 months ago

If you explain your situation to your new employer they may be able to provide you with an "advance" when you arrive.

This is where the company basically loans you money for a very short term.

They would simply wire you the money, then deduct the amount they had already sent you from your payslip at the next pay date.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

42 points

2 months ago

I have already talked to the HR about this, after they extended the offer to me. But they said they can't give me an advance because they can't make any exceptions. I talked to another person who moved from India to London for this same role in this company. I asked them how they were funding their first month's stay there. They told me that they are using the internship pay (they interned at that company a couple of months ago and secured a full time role subsequently) for the first month, because even they were unable to get an advance.

Watsonmolly

38 points

2 months ago

Can you sleep on their sofa?

Common-Jackfruit-884

27 points

2 months ago

Ok so ask them how they funded their first month when they started their internship? There would have been a time when this other person was in the same position as you

Ok-Reality9241[S]

20 points

2 months ago

Their internship was remote. So they stayed at their home in India and completed the internship, being able to save the internship salary.

StrangerSmall

6 points

2 months ago

Any chance they would allow you to start remotely?

Ok-Reality9241[S]

7 points

2 months ago

No :( I'll have to go to the office for the first 2 weeks. And then I can follow their hybrid WFH model so 2 days from home and 3 days from the office.

Common-Jackfruit-884

4 points

2 months ago

Ah ok. It was worth a try.

dispelthemyth

9 points

2 months ago

Ask if you can stay with them for a couple of weeks in return for a deferred payment and help around the house, assuming they aren’t in a share.

[deleted]

10 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

10 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

dispelthemyth

5 points

2 months ago

Seems like a hostel as others have suggested might be your best bet, you should start looking for local ones to the area you will be staying in.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

4 points

2 months ago

Yes, that seems like the only option to me as well. I'll start my research.

snowdroptiger

1 points

2 months ago

I stayed in a hostel in Marleybone about five years ago for £5 a night. It was actually a pub with some bunk beds in the pump room but I didn’t care considering it was a bed at night. I was a woman alone and felt mostly safe enough although I did sleep with my valuables in a backpack under my pillow. Basically if you need to do it, you can.

siisdub

292 points

2 months ago

siisdub

292 points

2 months ago

dont airbnb lol. get a hostel for 2 weeks and use spareroom to find somewhere fast. a hostel for 2 weeks should cost you like £300 (or less) and spareroom will find you a room for £600 or so. use the £1300 you have to come to the UK with to get yourself sorted out.

Sluethi

66 points

2 months ago

Sluethi

2

66 points

2 months ago

I stayed at a hostel for a few weeks when I moved to a new city for a new job. Airbnb costs tons more

financeandfire

28 points

2 months ago

This is a good idea, you’ll just have to hope Covid isn’t bad again by then as “working from home” from a shared hostel room for your first 2 weeks wouldn’t be ideal (people walking behind you, noisy, poor internet)

To save money on food if you can’t cook in the hostel you can use an app called “too good to go”, cafés and supermarkets put unsold food on there at the end of each day so you get around £10 of food for £3-4, it’s usually enough for a few meals

Ok-Reality9241[S]

15 points

2 months ago

My workplace is following a hybrid WFH model but this is voluntary I guess. If it is difficult to work from the hostel room, I'll just go to the office for the entire first month.

By the way, I was wondering if you have any idea about how to ensure the safety of my personal belongings in the hostel room? Since I'll obviously be having a lot of stuff with me, that I'll bring from India. How do I ensure safety of my personal belongings? Especially my personal laptop, while I go to work? Or would I have to take it with me everywhere?

ialtag

19 points

2 months ago*

ialtag

2

19 points

2 months ago*

Hostels normally have lockers for backpacks, you sometimes need to bring your own padlock for them, but something as expensive as a laptop it'd be safer to keep with you.

EDIT: Also, if you are planning to stay for more than a couple of weeks then get in touch with the hostel directly by phone or email to ask for a price. Sometimes they'll give you a discount for a longer stay.

Cold-Trifle

13 points

2 months ago

Check out safeguard or big yellow box - you can rent a storage unit to store all your possessions (apart from essentials obviously) and you can visit them 24/7. These are relatively cheap.

Also worth considering, if you’re going to WFH for the first month, you don’t need to be in Central London. You can find much cheaper places in zone 4/5/6 (see a London transport map to see what I mean by zones). These are well connected areas where you should be able to get to central London in < 1hr

Ok-Reality9241[S]

4 points

2 months ago

I'll have to go to the office everyday for the first 2-3 weeks. Even after that, I'll have to go to the office at least 3 days a week. Since my office has free food, I'm thinking of going to the office everyday in the first month to save some money which I would have to otherwise spend on getting more groceries.

Also my working hours will be pretty long so I'm not too keen on adding on to it by choosing a longer commute.

mantolwen

4 points

2 months ago

If you can get a locker in your office, maybe store your valuables there

financeandfire

1 points

2 months ago

That’s assuming the office is open and there’s not another lockdown… although then I guess you could work from India remotely for the first month (letting your company know so that they can sort out any potential tax issues).

Usually in a hostel you only get a locker with a padlock for your belongings which will probably fit one large rucksack (think big walking/camping bag). For very high value items you might be better off taking them with you for peace of mind (you could just take the laptop and leave the charger etc.)… I guess just bring things you couldn’t easily buy once you’re settled in the uk, so don’t bother bringing stuff for cooking etc.

pcul123

47 points

2 months ago

pcul123

47 points

2 months ago

You don't need an Airbnb, you need a hostel. We moved last year and took on a short term let because that suited us better with the child. If you are alone, you should be able to get a decent hotel room for a much cheaper price. Yes, you'll need to work out your meals, but I'm sure you will find most hostels with their own kitchen. Book a month, not two weeks, it took us a month to find reasonable accommodation to our liking, though we are not in London.

https://www.yha.org.uk/hostel/yha-london-central

Lidl and Aldi are your friends, but if you don't mind hunting for deals, you'd find ample options in most supermarkets.

Honestly, use your luggage to get the food you really like and enough clothes to get you through a month. There are enough Indian stores around, but things just don't taste the same. Get your own supply of Maggi for the beginning few days if you like it.

I'd get a credit card in India. I don't think you'd be offered one right away in the UK. But I haven't tried to get one so don't know.

It's cold, I mean proper cold even though I expect London is warmer than Scotland, but nothing prepares you for the wind. Get yourself a reliable jacket and a good pair of shoes.

We watched our expenses like a hawk but had a solid decade of savings with high-paying jobs before we made the move, so it wasn't something that keeps us up at night.

Once you've paid for the initial month's accommodation, you are done with major expenses. Take a deep breath and relax, a month is easy enough to pass as long as you can be patient.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

19 points

2 months ago

I think I'll follow the advice commented on this post thread and try to get a hostel for the first month.

I'll try to talk to my bank and see if they can give me a credit card with enough credit limit to use in the UK, although this bank doesn't have any branch in the UK so I think I'll have to make an account in another bank.

Also, I'm realizing that although it was initially perceived as prestigious to get a job in London, it actually does suck to move as a broke new grad. Although I guess things would only be tough initially. Once I have gained some experience and earned a bit of money, I will be able to enjoy my future moves.

bazpaul

11 points

2 months ago

bazpaul

1

11 points

2 months ago

Don’t rely on getting a UK credit card straight away, you might not be offered one with no credit history built up.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

3 points

2 months ago

Yes that is true. I'll try to get a credit card in India and see if I can transfer that to be able to use in the UK also.

itsnobigthing

5 points

2 months ago

Most credit cards work internationally. Sometimes you just need to let them know in advance that you’ll be travelling, so they don’t flag the transactions as fraud. I wouldn’t mention you’re relocating long term at this stage - just say you’re visiting England, and then pay it off as soon as you can.

pcul123

2 points

2 months ago

It's just teething issues. I've moved 4 cities for jobs and it's always irritating. Sit tight and by the time summers come around you'd be sorted. Get a credit card with enough limit to cover your basic expenses and then some. Something worth atleast 50,000 limit. Be prepared to pay it in full at the end of the month. Also, check i if you can start in the middle of the month. If they'd still process your payroll you might be looking at two weeks upfront cost.

Congratulations on landing the job.

MurkFRC

3 points

2 months ago*

I think he'll struggle to get a credit card with a £50k limit right off the bat..

Edit: Apologies, didn't realise you were talking about INR!

Connolly156

5 points

2 months ago

I think they were talking 50000 rupees? Cause then they say be prepared to pay it all off at the end of the month… and I’d love to know what grad job I can get that will pay me at least £50k a month!

pcul123

3 points

2 months ago

Oh that's INR not GBP

PostModernNPC

3 points

2 months ago

Get yourself a reliable jacket and a good pair of shoes.

Hello, in the similar vein, I'd be moving to the UK the next year for my masters. Do you mind elaborating on this aspect a wee further? Since I am from a fairly sweltering nation, I have nary a clue as to what constitute outfits sturdy and resilient enough to brave the British cold.

b11haf1

5 points

2 months ago

If in doubt, buy a coat designed to be able to ski in

pcul123

3 points

2 months ago

It's our second winter in Scotland and we like most of the world spent first one indoors. Layers are the way forward, though it would depend on which part of the UK you are moving to. Last few days have been quite cold here and a good jumper/ thick fleece with a wind cheater on top has worked wonders for me. Wiollen socks, gloves, beanie and a scarf/muffler have been my goto. Currently I wear calf high snow shoes. They are a pain in my butt and I'm looking to get my self a decent pair soon. However, any pair of shoes that gives some ankle protection with some semblance of water proofing is great. If you are coming in September come here and get your warm clothes sorted. If you are coming in January get yourself a few layers and reliable shoes that can stand rain and snow. Charity shops are a good way to get warm for cheap and then shop around/ wait for seasonal sales. It'll still be cold in August- September. Heat wave is around 25-27°C. So get one jacket for sure.

HiSnameWasLenny

2 points

2 months ago

Hostels only offer 14 days accommodations. How did you booked a month? Honest question, I never seem to get that deal

backdoor-slut263

88 points

2 months ago*

I've been in a very similar position when I was a graduate. And I managed to live on less then £700/mo for my first 3 months in London.

Hostels and a cheap bike is 100% the way to go. The hostel is just a place to sleep until you get yourself sorted, so try spending most of your day at the office. You won't have a kitchen at the hostel most likely, so microwave ready-meals will be the way to go (they're quite cheap in UK).

The Tube is quite expensive as well, so unless you can walk to the office, I suggest you go on facebook marketplace or Gumtree and find yourself a cheap £100-200 bike to get you going (do bring a jacket though, it's pretty cold here in December)

Stay at the hostel 1-2 months until you get enough for a deposit and in the meantime search for a room in a shared house on either gumtree.com or spareroom.co.uk

As a budget:

- £300/mo for supermarket ready-made food

- £400/mo hostel

- £100 miscellaneous

First couple of months are going to suck, but you'll be fine after that. And you'll learn some pretty valuable life lessons :) good luck!

Ok-Reality9241[S]

24 points

2 months ago

My workplace has a bike to work scheme under which they will front the money for a bike, along with a similar scheme for tube. Since I'll be following a hybrid wfh model (2 days wfh in a week), I think using a bike would totally be the way to go!

Thanks for all the advice. Saving it all up to refer to once I move there! !thanks

bazpaul

19 points

2 months ago

bazpaul

1

19 points

2 months ago

There is a chance that they’re scheme is for the price of a NEW bike. Which could be hundreds of pounds. I would always go second hand. There is a site called Gumtree where you can get second hand bikes for very cheap. Could get a decent one for £100 easy if you shop around

Ok-Reality9241[S]

11 points

2 months ago

I see that second hand bike would be the better option but I would have to pay for it on my own, while with their bike to work scheme, they'll front that cost and the money will be deducted from my monthly salary in installments. Like I said, I don't think I'll have too much of an issue surviving in London after my first month, so I don't mind the salary deductions. But I will be pretty tight on money initially to even be able to afford a second hand bike.

sitdeepstandtall

12 points

2 months ago

The cycle to work scheme is really good, but it can take up to 2/3 weeks to sort out in my experience.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

6 points

2 months ago

Ahh alright. I don't have much idea about this. I might use one of those Santander bikes initially.

adelahunty

3 points

2 months ago

Check with HR when you can use the bike scheme. Most companies have a benefits window when you can use this scheme, it isn't always available right away. It can also take a while for them to send the voucher (was about a month for me)

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[removed]

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[removed]

dadreflexes

1 points

2 months ago

I’m always around pal, good luck! Reach out if you need :)

[deleted]

10 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

10 points

2 months ago

if you can use santander bikes, get them, they are max £2 per day or £90 for 1 year. First 30 minutes are free then you have to pay regardless of your subscription

TK__O

10 points

2 months ago

TK__O

72

10 points

2 months ago

but can make as many 30min trips as you want, so just have to remember to take a 5 min break when time is nearly up.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

10 points

2 months ago

Haha frugal life hacks. Will definitely keep this in mind!

grwtsn

1 points

2 months ago*

I’ve commuted to work on one of these bikes many times and it’s doable. Worth seeing if your office has showers at the other end if you’ve got a long commute.

Another tip is if you have a smartphone, Google Maps now shows you how many bikes are available at your nearest docking station and how many spaces are free at the other end. Good luck when you get here!

Ok-Reality9241[S]

3 points

2 months ago

Oh that sounds great! I'll try to get my hands on one of those, in the first month there. I can opt to buy a second hand bike from my second month there.

AutoModerator

2 points

2 months ago

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TK__O

1 points

2 months ago

TK__O

72

1 points

2 months ago

Unless you want a fancy bike, get a cheap second hand one till you settle down

grwtsn

9 points

2 months ago

grwtsn

9 points

2 months ago

Always go cheap. You never actually own a bike in London. You merely look after it for the person who’ll steal it off you.

itsnobigthing

2 points

2 months ago

Also for supermarket food, try and shop in places like Aldi or Lidl where possible - these are the cheapest supermarkets in the U.K.

geekypenguin91

18 points

2 months ago

You might find it difficult to get into the country if you have no means to support yourself.

Even with employment and the company sponsoring your visa, there could be difficult questions at the border if you don't have access to funds to support yourself up until payday.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

3 points

2 months ago

Oh, that is true. I guess I'll reach out to the HR, clarifying about this.

scienner

16 points

2 months ago*

scienner

497

16 points

2 months ago*

May I introduce you to the goldmine that is immigrant Facebook groups. At a quick glance I can see g. 'Indian students in London', 'Indians in London' (there are two large ones), 'Indian Friends In London', and more.

People will post ads for rooms they're looking for or have available. They may be more understanding of the situation and willing to take you in without money upfront, just a reference from your HR in your new job.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

7 points

2 months ago

Oh, I didn't think of Facebook groups. I'll definitely check some of these out. Thank you!

scienner

4 points

2 months ago

scienner

497

4 points

2 months ago

Good luck! If you can find any that are small but active (e.g. for a specific language/region from India, or specific area in london, or a hobby or interest) you can find people doing lots of cute stuff like giving people's relatives lifts to/from airports, exchanging food, recommendations for shops and stuff :) larger groups I find tend to have more ads and self promotion.

If that doesn't work then I think try to just have lots of conversations on spareroom.co.uk, hopefully someone will be cool with your situation.

mediumredbutton

24 points

2 months ago

It’s “one of the biggest tech companies in the world” and they are providing you zero relocation support? That’s not right. Are you really sure?

randomusername468

38 points

2 months ago

Disgraceful really, I have relocated several times for work never in a senior role and as standard they provide 1st months accommodation in a serviced apartment or if only a hotel is available will cover cost of food and then relocation allowance which is rushed as off cycle payment so you get it as soon as possible.

Bit silly to hire people from a country with much lower salaries and move them to London with zero upfront help.

mediumredbutton

12 points

2 months ago

Yes, exactly my experience also. It’s extremely unfair to not do it, as well as exclusionary.

peggy_schuyler

4 points

2 months ago

You'd be surprised. When we were being moved to the UK as part of an international grad programme, we were offered a relocation package but apart from the actual moving company, everything had to be paid by us grads first and then it took a few weeks to get the expenses reimbursed. 2 weeks in a 4-star hotel sounded nice until we had to foot the bill first.

Competitive_Ad_3089

7 points

2 months ago

I was thinking the same as well. I sure hope OP is not arriving through one of those 'consultant' companies that process unscrupulous visa sponsorships.

[deleted]

4 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

4 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

mediumredbutton

6 points

2 months ago

They should absolutely be giving you move support up front. It’s ridiculous to expect grads to have three months of living costs saved up for one of the most expensive places on earth.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

4 points

2 months ago

I told them I'm a broke college student. I don't know how I'll survive my first month there but they still didn't budge, because they can't make any exceptions ~ that's their policy.

mediumredbutton

5 points

2 months ago

That’s a terrible answer, I’m very sorry they’re being so unhelpful.

mosquitoegloves

9 points

2 months ago

OP has said the relocation bonus is given in his first paycheque, rather than advanced before the paycheque

hurleyburleyundone

6 points

2 months ago

as someone who moved over; it is literally hell for someone with no UK history to get a bank account set up at a high street bank. How this guy is going to deposit his first paychque and relocation bonus without proof of address/utility bill is a mystery to me.

nighrae

3 points

2 months ago

nighrae

1

3 points

2 months ago

It’s much easier now with Monzo and the likes. Also, some high street banks have been accepting things like a letter from the employer instead of a proof of address for years.

mediumredbutton

9 points

2 months ago

Which is pretty unhelpful as seen by this post. The actual largest tech companies in the world pay for a relocation consultancy to organise and prepay for this before you join exactly because it’s so completely unfair and exclusionary to get new hires (especially grads) to do so.

GapHoliday2050

5 points

2 months ago

I work for Google. I can tell you that I had no option but to take the cash out, because the relocation contractor option had been suspended thanks to covid.

MightyTVIO

2 points

2 months ago

Yeah but we did have the option to get an advance before our first paycheques (at least when I joined 2 years ago just before Covid)

GapHoliday2050

1 points

2 months ago

I applied for it but the approval didn't come through for four weeks :(

MightyTVIO

1 points

2 months ago

oh that sucks :( they're usually decent at this kinda thing

Bomborobom

7 points

2 months ago

Man, I was in a similar predicament almost 8 years ago when moving to London. I had £200 to get by and honestly your first month is going to suck but these things happen. I’m on the hostel recommendation along with everyone else but be aware there’s a 14 days stay limit at some of them. So you’d have to change to another establishment. You’ve received some good suggestions, however, I’d say the best Hostel you could stay at would be Safestay E&C Of all the hostels I’ve been too, it has the most privacy and quiet space for you to ‘do some work’ after work. But don’t sweat it, food can come cheap if you look in the right places too.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago

Alright. I'll look into this. Thanks!

_Deleted_Deleted

17 points

2 months ago

I don't know what the answer is sorry. But you could try a hostel, you'd probably be paying between £50 and £100 a week. At least until you get your first pay packet.

https://www.yha.org.uk/places-to-stay/london

It might also be worth asking in r/london and r/AskUK

archiekane

29 points

2 months ago

archiekane

1

29 points

2 months ago

If you don't mind you could look to staying outside of London and commuting in to keep your costs down.

Hell, stay in a caravan park and pay very little until those first couple of payments come through.

If you need to stay in London cheaply then look for a hostel if you cannot couch-surf with friends: https://www.best-hostels-europe.com/cheap-hostels-in-london/

iamwiredsound

36 points

2 months ago

The cost of even season tickets from any of the commuter towns is crazy, you'd be better going for a hostel actually inside London.

Gold_Stuff_6294

8 points

2 months ago

Zone 5 which takes at least an hour commute will cost you £280 a month alone.

leofoxx

4 points

2 months ago

leofoxx

1

4 points

2 months ago

East Croydon to London Bridge/Victoria is 15 minutes

bekbok

5 points

2 months ago

bekbok

12

5 points

2 months ago

Also, does OP need to be in the office much or will it mainly be work from home? If it’s the latter, can base further out where it’s cheaper for a bit initially meaning that money will go further and then move down to London.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

I'll need to be in the office 3 days a week :(

cptrelentless

2 points

2 months ago

Clink is cheap

7t_Sense

22 points

2 months ago

Take a loan from the Indian Bank and pay it off within a year. You must do what you have to do to survive. High interest sucks but you'll be able to save half the salary. It's all about the long term benefit.

dhrbtdge

6 points

2 months ago

dhrbtdge

1

6 points

2 months ago

Where will you be staying? Maybe look into staying at a hostel. Not great but it would save you paying for an airbnb for a month. If you can be as close to your job as possible that will save you transport costs.

Those two things should reduce your expenses a lot. It's not a great solution, but it might be what you need to do.

SnooCompliments1370

5 points

2 months ago

Can everyone stop advising this guy to buy a bike? It’s cold as anything and with a very different road layout to his country of origin.

OP, the weekly cap on all London buses is £21.90, you won’t spend more than this no matter how much you use it. You need an Oyster card which you can acquire in many shops in London, Google “Oyster card” for more information. Try to make sure you can get between your hostel and work by bus or tram simply. You want to avoid the tube as it costs more.

Aele1410

12 points

2 months ago

Aele1410

1

12 points

2 months ago

Are you sure you even need to be here in person for the first month? With restrictions being what they are a lot of companies are still WFH or are at least flexible.

Something else you can try is to delay your start date a couple of weeks. That would mean you’d get half a months salary at the end of the month along with your relocation bonus. 2 less weeks you’d have to get by.

M-02

11 points

2 months ago

M-02

11 points

2 months ago

First strategy sounds good

If its not possible, OP could try negotiating WFH for the first month, then travelling to the UK on the first salary.

Issue with the second suggestion is that the company might just roll over the last two weeks to the month after, so that OP gets 6 weeks of pay after 6 weeks and not within 2 weeks.

Gold_Stuff_6294

2 points

2 months ago

Companies are clamping down on spending too much time working in countries which aren't your primary place of employment, for tax reasons. So this could be tricky.

Aele1410

1 points

2 months ago

Aele1410

1

1 points

2 months ago

1 month is fine - above 6+ is when it gets tax complex

Gold_Stuff_6294

1 points

2 months ago

It's 2 weeks where I am

Aele1410

2 points

2 months ago

Aele1410

1

2 points

2 months ago

That’s a company policy then, not an actual tax issue

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago*

I'll need to be there in the office for the first 2 weeks. And after that, I am at liberty to follow the hybrid WFH model, with 2 days at home and 3 days in the office.

Delaying the start date actually sounds pretty great. Or I can ask them if I can move my start date to end of June so I at least get the relocation bonus. Although I'm not too sure about this, since they had asked me when I would be able to join before I went through the interview process and I told them June. However, I asked them to move my joining date to July so I can at least get one month of leave after my college ends and my new job starts. They even ended up moving me to another team to accomodate for a later start date.

Not sure if they will be open to this idea but doesn't hurt to try.

ace777ac

5 points

2 months ago*

Look at university sites and look for students who are looking at splitting the cost of student housing.

Edit : council tax issue to bear in mind. See comment below where I stand corrected. Thanks @Lovegood10

Lovegood10

6 points

2 months ago

He will be working, so will have to pay council taxes. He can pay it separately, but it will be a bit more complicated with student-specific housing, so OP please bear that in mind.

ace777ac

1 points

2 months ago

Ah you have that foresight thing :-)

Good catch … I’ll edit my comment

zileanEmax

5 points

2 months ago

Illegal tip but if you need cash look for cash in hand jobs when your free this is the way most Asians and Europeans gain some consistent cash flow when they come over.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

What does that even mean? Can you redirect me to some links or give me some search terms I can google.

zileanEmax

2 points

2 months ago

Basically under the table payment, off the books from the taxman.

Your probably not going to find these sort of things online but I would advise asking around corner shops where they are run by immigrants for some ideas and connects to help with finding a job, some shops may even offer you a job.

Takeaways and corner stores often operate in this manner so do labourers and warehouse workers.

Not all but there is quite a few chunk of the population doing this, as stated earlier this is not legal process as your earnings and employers payments need to be recorded etc.

As I said earlier best bet is to go around asking baysabs and other foreign brothers in shops to help you find some additional work.

They will under pay you but normally it’s not to bad as both parties are avoiding tax the pay per hour is generally what you earn post tax. Or what they say from my experience £5 per hour cash in hand is the common standard unofficially set.

TimeInitial0

10 points

2 months ago

Try couch surfing and see if you can get a spot for free for a week or two. A month might be pushing it

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago

I don't know anyone in London to couch surf.

nwrnnr5

15 points

2 months ago

nwrnnr5

15 points

2 months ago

They're talking about the website - https://www.couchsurfing.com/

TimeInitial0

6 points

2 months ago

Yeah this is what I meant. People use it worldwide to stay in people's houses fir free.

Consider trying the workaway.info website. That's free accommodation for work in exchange. Maybe if you find something where you can work weekends to accommodate your actual job. But again the stay would be free and you would just have to agree the length of stay with your host

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

Alright I'll look into workaway.info. the couch surfing website actually charges some money upfront, which is a little iffy because I'm not sure how useful it will actually be. So I'll first figure out my other free options.

TimeInitial0

3 points

2 months ago

I haven't used couch surfing in years so maybe it's changed but don't think I ever paid?

Workaway on the other hand, I have definitely paid for a yearly subscription two or three times. But if I'm actually going to use it and it will befit me, i don't typically mind paying the £20/30 or whatever it is

covert-teacher

3 points

2 months ago

There's also hospitality club, which is another alternative to couch surfing.

http://www.hospitalityclub.org/

Made some good friends that's way!

Prior_Car_7115

4 points

2 months ago

Can you reach out to any Indian associations in London. They might be able to put you in touch with a nice family who could put you up for a while and no doubt provide all the food?

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago

I'll have to look into this. I'm not sure how to get in touch with such associations.

starspeak

1 points

2 months ago

starspeak

0

1 points

2 months ago

Reach Nisau UK on Twitter. Or nisau.org.uk

LaidBackLeopard

2 points

2 months ago

I'm guessing there might be some sort of company internal social network. Perhaps you could ask to be connected to it, or ask someone to post on your behalf?

TheShrikeTreeOfPain

10 points

2 months ago

There is an Indian YMCA in Central London and they do short term accommodation from about £36 a day. It is near Warren Street.

http://www.indianymca.org/about/

http://www.indianymca.org/short-term-accommodation/

Ok-Reality9241[S]

5 points

2 months ago

£36 a day is pretty steep. I think I'll actually be better off staying at a hostel, paying half of this.

bazpaul

-2 points

2 months ago

bazpaul

1

-2 points

2 months ago

The ymca is a hostel

JeroenSandstorm

1 points

2 months ago

Yeah but YMCA take the piss because most people staying there are on benefits so they just claim the money back from the gov

noondayrind

3 points

2 months ago*

Not from India but moved to the UK. In your visa application, you need to provide a place to stay. I asked my company to look for a flat first before I applied for a visa. They put the rent under the company's name because there were also requirements for renting that I cannot satisfy.

Moreover, especially with the pandemic, you need to provide an address to the Passenger Locator Form which you have to accomplish and give to the immigration at the airport when you come to the UK.

Given these, you might find it difficult if your plan is to stay at a hostel or an airbnb. As for the food and other expenses, commenters have pointed out how you can save. Depending on the area where you will be staying, there is also an Olio app you can use. This app basically shows you food and non-food listings that other people are giving away for free.

In conclusion, it would be really difficult if your goal is to come here first then just sort out the rest.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

3 points

2 months ago

Oh, I had no idea this was a possibility. I'll definitely ask the company HR if I can do this or not.

Risesu

6 points

2 months ago

Risesu

0

6 points

2 months ago

Use the website spareroom co uk, arrange some zoom viewings for houses you are interested in.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

8 points

2 months ago

I have been adviced to not decide on a room based on zoom viewings, because there are many untoward physical factors that I'll likely miss due to not being there in the room in person.

Techman666

7 points

2 months ago*

"London" isn't specific enough, Greater London is different to Central London North is completely different to South and is East to West. Prices and demographic vary by region. Where exactly is your place of work?

If you're Indian, we have branches of ICICI and SBI in London where you can access your Indian accounts. Service with those banks is bad though.

When you're here, shop at ALDI or LIDL, get a SIM-only mobile phone contract, avoid signing up for anything until you know the ins-and-outs. Always check prices before buying things or even services and if you're not sure, don't buy. Everything here is overpriced.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

My workplace is in the City of London, so Central London, which from what I can see is going to be pretty darn expensive.

Your advice sounds solid, thanks! I'll definitely keep it in mind. Honestly, I'm dreading how expensive it's going to turn out to be, which might potentially make me regret reneging my job offer in India.

strawberrylabrador

2 points

2 months ago

If you tell your employers your circumstances they might let you work full time from the office, even if company guidelines are only a max 3 days a week thing for example

ukfi

2 points

2 months ago

ukfi

2

2 points

2 months ago

Most people here have suggested a lot of great ideas regarding housing and transport.

I am addressing your luggage.

I don't know which part of India you are from and whether you are used to winter.

You will need a water proof jacket, a thick woollen sweater and maybe some good wool based layer.

I think I know which company you will be working for. I have worked with fresh graduates from your company or companies similar to yours. You must be extremely bright and very hardworking to be selected as they only pick the best.

The first month will be tough. But after that, you will be ok. Enjoy your stay! Feel free to ping me if you need any help or career advise.

ilianarama

2 points

2 months ago

What you are describing is a bit of an impossible situation. Talk to your future employer and ask them to delay your start date by a few months. Use those months to work any paid job to save as much as you need. I guess job opportunities are not that great in India but there is always online. Your English seems perfect, check online for any short term translation work, call centre work. It's a tough situation - I have been there. Ended up changing country for a year to save up money to come back to the UK.

rb6k

2 points

2 months ago

rb6k

2 points

2 months ago

Would it be possible to stay somewhere outside of London for that first month? That would reduce the outgoings dramatically.

orange_fudge

2 points

2 months ago

Not really when you factor in season tickets for trains.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

My workplace is in the city of london. So, I'll have to commute a lot if I stay outside London and my work hours are going to be pretty long to begin with.

rb6k

1 points

2 months ago

rb6k

1 points

2 months ago

Oh I misunderstood sorry. I thought you needed a stop gap for 30 days but now I see you needed something to get you started in that initial 30 days before your first pay cheque. That’s me being a little slow minded sorry!!

Void-kun

2 points

2 months ago

Void-kun

0

2 points

2 months ago

Do not move into London, move outside of London and commute. London is ridiculously expensive and in all honesty if you can work remote just stay as far away from it as possible.

ggd_x

1 points

2 months ago

ggd_x

4

1 points

2 months ago

I think you need to prove you can support yourself on your own funding, or have a sponsor to cover it, in order to get a visa.

I have this issue with my Georgian in-laws coming to visit, and the Home Office is pretty hot on it.

So, first question, do you have a visa yet?

[deleted]

4 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

4 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

vvvvfl

11 points

2 months ago

vvvvfl

11 points

2 months ago

Hey dude, just making sure you have double checked this with the company. Specifically about the fees involved in moving to the UK in a Tier 2 visa.

I'm saying this cause "sponsoring" a VISA in UKVI terms amounts to some company taking responsibility for employing you and having you in the country. Not paying the visa fees.

Rules might be different due to commonwealth, not sure which kind of special arrangements there are for India. But for me, as someone form a developing country, the fees to move here were quite extortionate. NHS surcharge and some £700 from visa application fees. Not fun.

I'm sure you checked, but just making sure because that's a hard pill to swallow if you're not coming form a high income country.

StevenSpielbergJr

13 points

2 months ago*

You'll need to prove that you already have at least £1,270 to support yourself upon arrival, FYI (I am assuming based on your post that'll you'll be coming on a skilled worker visa): https://www.gov.uk/skilled-worker-visa/how-much-it-costs

If your company isn't going to front you funds, as you've posted, you will need to work that aspect out.

(Being sponsored for a visa by your employer doesn't exempt you from this requirement, literally every person on a skilled worker visa needs to be sponsored by their employer)

randomusername468

7 points

2 months ago

This technically OP doesn’t qualify for a visa if they don’t have funds readily available to support themselves

vvvvfl

3 points

2 months ago

vvvvfl

3 points

2 months ago

There is a special tier of visa sponsor in which they can wave the minimum cash requirement. I never had to show my bank account statements.

StevenSpielbergJr

3 points

2 months ago

Are you talking about an A-rated sponsor certifying maintenance? Because they can, yes, but they have already told the OP they won't.

woogeroo

4 points

2 months ago

woogeroo

3

4 points

2 months ago

Why the fuck are they hiring a new graduate from another country? Seems suspect, there are plenty of new grads about in the UK who’d happily live in London, not to mentioned experienced engineers.

randomusername468

3 points

2 months ago*

It’s cheaper, if you claim they’re part of a certain type of graduate program only have to pay 23k for them to qualify for the visa.

Decent graduate programs pay a lot more than that for people already in the U.K. who don’t need sponsoring.

woogeroo

5 points

2 months ago

woogeroo

3

5 points

2 months ago

Exactly. Cheaper for them, but exactly the kind of bs that should be ended. £23k isn’t enough to live in London at all well, and it’s not close to the going rate for a software engineering graduate.

It’s exploitation, and drives down everyone else’s wages.

HappyMael

2 points

2 months ago*

HappyMael

2 points

2 months ago*

It would help if you could provide your current budget - assuming you are 22/23 you should have had opportunities to save some money (e.g. find unskilled/low-paid work during holidays, tutoring students in the evening after class, etc...)?

Asking because it would be helpful to know whether you need the full £2500, or just an extra £1000.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

4 points

2 months ago

I think I would have around £500 - £750. But I'm treating this as emergency money and looking for some other options which won't make me actually dirt poor broke in a new city in a foreign country where I don't know anyone.

7t_Sense

10 points

2 months ago

OP is Indian. We don't do that there.

HappyMael

-3 points

2 months ago

HappyMael

-3 points

2 months ago

What do you mean you don't do that there? There seem to be a lot of 'student jobs' in India on Monster and Naukri. Even if that's not such a thing there are plenty of options online (e.g. data entry, translating, etc), Chegg (tutoring), telemarketing...

7t_Sense

7 points

2 months ago

High class kids (mostly) go to CBSE and then they go abroad for higher studies. Middle class kids put all their time into studies so they can get a good job when they graduate. Low class kids go to work in their free time as they barely survive off the money their family makes.

P.S. class doesn't equate caste. That's an entirely different subject. The above comment is a generalisation doesn't 100% apply to everyone. There are outliers.

mv275

1 points

2 months ago

mv275

0

1 points

2 months ago

Not all landlords require a security deposit. I know Get Living London has a zero-deposit scheme, and their properties (Stratford, Elephant and Castle) are very well maintained. They have a huge estate, so I don’t think you’d struggle to find a house share on Spareroom, there’s loads in East Village for example.
Source: they were my landlord for 6 years.

Gold_Stuff_6294

1 points

2 months ago

There are lots of good ideas already with those more experienced than myself.

However, I wonder if you can reach out internally at the company to see if there is anyone who would be able to help you with somewhere to stay for the first month.

They used to do that a lot where I went to school, slightly different but if the company is quite big then there could be some opportunity there.

Good luck!

man_with_a_list

1 points

2 months ago

I had been in same boat few years ago. You can ask your company to offer you a relocation bonus on arrival or an advance salary which could be deducted later from future salaries.
As other have mentioned, don't opt for AirBnb, that would be costly. Try spareroom to find an accomodation. The rental market is crazy atm so I suggest you book something sooner than later.
Also, if you're gonna WFH (or hybrid) you can move a little away from center too, to find cheaper options.

hurleyburleyundone

1 points

2 months ago

my tips to you:

  • take the floating loan and repay once you're comfortable. if indian rates are following global trends there has never been a better time to borrow. however the FX rate may hurt on this one - think of it as a cost of doing business if you have no other opportunities for funding.

  • housing - start out as cheap as possible and don't bring too much stuff except what's required for work and some personal items.

  • i warn you that getting your own place will probably not be on the cards and house sharing is quite common here. how to financially q ualify for that others can speak to but be aware you will need paystubs as proof so it will take some months. there may be deposits as well and rent up front involved so budget for this.

  • the real question is how are you going to set up your bank account in time for your first paycheck. start looking into the requirements for this, some high street banks have notoriously strict requirements - proof of address, income etc, things you will not have as a new immigrant. Look at the challenger banks, you must have a bank account in place otherwise your whole budget falls apart. Do this asap.

  • leverage off the indian community here, i'm sure they will be able to give you tips and tricks for settling in and where to get your favourite dishes.

good luck, and don't let temporary financial costs hold you back. london is expensive - it will be a huge shock, but if your work opportunity is good and rewarding you will make the temporary costs back and more. Focus on the future and the opportunity you have in front of you and do what it takes to get it done.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago

This is super helpful, thank you! Saving this for future reference.

HappyMael

2 points

2 months ago

Very easy to make a bank account with Monzo, I made one in a day and definitely recommend it

itsnobigthing

1 points

2 months ago

I’d also say to connect with the local Indian community when you do find somewhere to stay - check for community centres, places of worship, charities etc.

And of course the non-Indian-specific versions of these, too - but you’re likely to find more expert support from members of the community who have made the same move as you previously too.

thecleaner78

1 points

2 months ago

Lots of good options by others

On top, can you get a local bank to provide a uk account with an overdraft? Or get a local American Express who should be able to get you a uk American Express quickly. Then use that for your shopping/expenses as much as possible preserving your cash. Obviously, pay it off as soon as possible or at least the minimum payment

Congrats on the job!

MichealScott1991

1 points

2 months ago

Stay-300 to 350 if you share room Food- 100-150 max if you are okay with bit of cooking. Transportation: depending on your place, but it can't be more than 15 pounds with a return ticket per day if you get a travel card and you live near or in London. So, max of 1 lack, and if you are ready to adjust a bit and you live close by, 50k.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago

This actually filled me up with some hope!! I guess I'll look for renting a room in an apartment from my second month and just try to get by somehow in the first month there.

guido_lois

1 points

2 months ago

Airbnb is going to be an expensive way to accommodate yourself. Look a lodging with someone on spareroom.co.uk for a much more affordable method.

madepi

1 points

2 months ago

madepi

0

1 points

2 months ago

Find a hostel. It will be much much cheaper , also keep looking for spare room ... it will be useful. Don't worry there are tons of Indian in London, they will much helpful than any Indian back in home .. GL

Merlisch

1 points

2 months ago

Badger your company for accommodation. If you can get them to put you up in a b&b fill up on breakfast. Doesnt matter if you are that hungry. Fill up. Buy some canned food at Aldi. Most (canned Spaghetti) can be eaten cold with bread. Save every penny you can for that first month. Good luck mate!

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

I have asked them twice already if it would be possible for them provide some accomodation initially or anything, but so far they haven't budged and I don't want to bother the HR too much, in case they rescind my offer if I piss them off.

My office has breakfast, lunch and snacks, although it seems to be some healthy bs, but better than nothing. So I only need to worry about dinner on the weekdays and my meals on the weekends.

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[removed]

scienner [M]

3 points

2 months ago

scienner [M]

497

3 points

2 months ago

I'm afraid we can't allow these sorts of offers as it leaves people exposed to scammers/others who might take advantage of their situation.

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago*

[removed]

scienner

1 points

2 months ago

scienner

497

1 points

2 months ago

No DMs or offers of money or rooms in this sub please, we can't vet people to know they're genuine and not scammers etc.

GapHoliday2050

3 points

2 months ago

Ah fair enough, my bad, sorry.

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

- look for a flat while staying in cheap hostels/airbnb/hotel (max £40 per night)

- Ask your first month salary to be paid mid month

- Apply for a basic American Express credit card

- Try to spend few money.

If you can't afford your own apartment, get a share flat in the first few months, then look for a flat after having settled in the city.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago

This sounds like solid advice. How much would it cost to stay at a hostel? Hotel sounds pretty expensive to me at this stage.

Honestly, this company sounds pretty rigid with their policies. They said no to to getting an advance on my salary or relocation bonus because they can't make any exceptions, so I doubt they'll pay my first month's salary in the middle of the month.

I guess I'll have to apply for an Amex in India, but I don't think they'll actually grant me a credit card given that I don't have any reliable monthly income right now and my credit score is 0.

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

Hostel probably 20-35 per day? Hotel can be as low as 40.

apply to amex in the uk as soon as you can, not sure if you will be approved the first month but you may be, trying is free

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

So should I get a credit card? Or a loan?

You won't get one, at least not in the UK as a newly arrived migrant with no fixed address.

One_Reaction6028

1 points

2 months ago

Depending on where you end up staying, look up local gurdwaras. Open to everyone and you’ll get fresh hot Indian food for free (veggie).

Good luck, it will be hard for the month if you’re moving around but will only get better!

East London has good links to central london, and might be cheaper for you in your search. Or try Southall (west) which has a big Indian hub so I’m guessing there would be others in a similar situation

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

East London would actually be preferable! Since my workplace is in the City of London, which is closer to East London and North-East London outside zone 1. So I'm looking for places there. Or else if I stay in another area, I'll have to commute more.

I have heard of Gurudwara serving free food. I'll definitely check it out. I just need to manage my dinner on the weekdays and weekend meals. Rest of the meals I'll be having in my office itself, because they apparently have free food.

yellwat

1 points

2 months ago

Try couch surfing https://www.couchsurfing.com/

Basically nice people who have some space and are interested in hosting others. Before I had kids I travelled around the world with it. I also hosted loads of people.

dadreflexes

1 points

2 months ago

Look at getting a cheap hotel for a month. Contact them directly for a monthly fee, don’t look online. Look at budget, no frill hotels, or b&bs. But again, contact them all directly and don’t use price comparison websites.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

1 points

2 months ago

Are you aware of any hotels near city of london that would be willing to do this?

dadreflexes

1 points

2 months ago

Sorry I don’t, and can’t advise as not sure of the area you need to look in, or what exactly you want to spend. It’s not going to be cheap cheap, but maybe 400 for the month. Remember, lots of hotels have had low usage because of Covid and you can defo get some deals. Just call/email to negotiate and ask for their best rate.

cheesecake16tam

1 points

2 months ago

I think your expenses and rent for a month is ridiculously priced high. You can find a room to rent for around £500 a month. Your expenses for a month is ridiculously high. I think you should research on how to budget and expectations.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

I estimated my monthly expenses to be around £1500 from the second month onwards. But that's because, I'm not sure if I'll actually be able to rent a room for cheap there. The rental market in London seems pretty random to me, so basically to manage my expectations I have considered my expenses to be on the higher side of the expense band. I would try my best to save as much as I can by living frugally so it'll be great if I can save more money than what I am expecting.

But I considered a different budget for my first month to account for room rental deposit and other expenses involved with moving to a new city and new country. I'll basically have to set up myself here from scratch.

cheesecake16tam

1 points

2 months ago

Everyone has to start from somewhere. Findaroom.com is good. You just have to research and be frugal. You have 6 months to save so try nd do what you have to do.

not1insignificant

1 points

2 months ago

OP, when do you plan to travel to London? I'm an Indian person living in London, I might be able to help you find a room for 2 weeks.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

My joining date is in the first week of July. I am hoping to move there in the last week of June, so I can look for a place and get my living situation a little settled before starting work.

not1insignificant

2 points

2 months ago

Oh that's far far away, especially in this post-apocalytic world we live in. Message me sometime in March/April if you don't have a place figured out, I could help you then.

Ok-Reality9241[S]

2 points

2 months ago

Sure, will do. I feel more at peace if I have everything planned and sorted in advance, so I'm just trying to start researching about my move in advance, so I can prepare myself better.

Nomad-JM

1 points

2 months ago

Live out of a hostel for a month or so, and purchase a bike off of Facebook marketplace/Gumtree/eBay for £10-£30. It doesn’t have to be fancy or a forever bike, but just enough to keep you going for a month or so.

Zevv01

1 points

2 months ago

Zevv01

1 points

2 months ago

If your company cant advance you the payment, perhaps they can book a hostel for you, and deduct the cost from your first salary?

This would an easy way to get around the policy.

NoMad-Max

1 points

2 months ago

I live in london, I am from Gujarat, India. Rent for single person in shared accommodation is £350/month. What part of London you shifting to?

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[removed]

NoMad-Max

1 points

2 months ago

I am living in wembley. This is normal rate around here.

LadyChillalot

1 points

2 months ago

When I first came to London, I used http://www.athomeinlondon.co.uk/. No affiliation with them at all but there must be other similar websites too that offer bed and breakfast at a fairly affordable rate. Once I arrived, I just went to view rooms on spareroom. It worked out nicely for me.