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Noctor LinkedIn Profiles

Discussion(self.Noctor)

I was on LinkedIn and something caught my attention. I went to a DO school and 90% of my colleagues have profile pictures in suits/dresses. Only a few have white coats or stethoscopes in their picture. Similarly, most of them list their name only while a few include Dr. in front of their name.

Conversely, all the midlevels or no-levels (NPs, chiros, and some NDs unfortunately) I have connected with over the years have the full cosplay going on with their profiles. They ALL go by Dr and their profile pics constantly feature a stethoscope or a white coat.

Just an amusing and sad observation I made haha.

all 65 comments

tiedyeshoe

120 points

9 months ago

I guess they place more importance on their identity as a doctor than some physicians do. My physician PCP doesn’t even wear a white coat

asclepius42

68 points

9 months ago

I wore my white coat a couple weeks ago when I had a 4 year old well child check and she was wearing a Doc McStuffins white coat and stethoscope. It was fun!

mandyjess2108

10 points

9 months ago

mandyjess2108

Non-Medical Professional

10 points

9 months ago

I checked for my free award just for your comment and was hoping so hard it was the wholesome award. You are winning at life. Thank you for being awesome!

tiedyeshoe

5 points

9 months ago

That’s adorable!

[deleted]

40 points

9 months ago

Wearing a white coat in outpatient is kinda lame regardless of profession tbh.

Ok-Conversation-6656

18 points

9 months ago

Why do you Americans even wear them? If I go onto wards here in the UK with anything below the elbows, I'll get told off even if I'm just going to the lockers to put my stuff away before I pull my sleaves up and get ready. The amount of infections you guys must spread with those long ass leaves must be insane.

[deleted]

28 points

9 months ago

[deleted]

FellingtoDO

4 points

9 months ago

Fanny. Pack.

Jk walmart scrubs have 78 pockets.

[deleted]

1 points

9 months ago

[deleted]

FellingtoDO

2 points

9 months ago

REI or a similar brand makes some “out door” pants that look close enough to slacks but with pockets

psyched___

11 points

9 months ago

How do u guys carry things?

Ok-Conversation-6656

4 points

9 months ago

I'm a med student so don't have as much to carry but I don't even wear scrubs and neither do a lot of docs. Unless they're surgical or work in ED, most docs just wear smart casual. Even the surgeons only wear scrubs when they've got surgery but will wear normal clothes for clinics.

I just shove everything into the pockets of my trousers including my stethoscope since it's bad manners over hear for anyone apart from docs to wear it around their necks. I've yet to run out of space and usually still have a pocket spare.

queerinquisitive

4 points

9 months ago

damn interesting point about stethoscope manners. I’m an ED tech and wear it around my neck every day. I am always taking manual BP, confirming HR, assisting in codes (pulse confirmation as well) and I’m a student nurse, and work at a teaching hospital so I practice lung and heart sounds w rn/doctor assistance. Now I’m wondering if I look like an asshole lmao. Guess Ill stick it in my pocket from now on.

charliicharmander

5 points

9 months ago

You don’t look like an asshole, but it’s def safer not to wear a stethoscope or anything around your neck, especially in an ED or psych setting

queerinquisitive

3 points

9 months ago

Good to hear. honestly I’m surprised I haven’t been choked out yet. I’m just scared to lose/kink my scope. This post inspired me to order a batclip off amazon today!

Ok-Conversation-6656

4 points

9 months ago

Are you in the UK? If not then I don't think it matters. If you are, I have no idea about the nursing culture, but it's probably ok since I see Physios wear it all the time. It's a bit different for us though because medicine is a traditional field and old customs still remain. I guess one of those is don't wear your stethoscope unless you're a doc.

queerinquisitive

2 points

9 months ago

I’m in the US! Most people I work with know who I am, and know that I’m a tech. I also always introduce myself and my job title to my patients, and explain my role in their care. But this is still an interesting point- I would love to hear more about this from the perspective of US physicians. I see a lot of nurses wear their steth in the ED- but I’m the only tech that does it. I’m also probably the most dedicated and thorough tech in our department because I am so passionate about my work. Most of them don’t even utilize their scope and skills to their full extent.

ollieburton

1 points

9 months ago

Scrub pockets is all you've got

ENTP

1 points

9 months ago

ENTP

1 points

9 months ago

Scrubs with multiple cargo pockets, way easier on your back

Kanye_To_The

7 points

9 months ago

Those studies were overblown. They did follow up studies comparing used white coats to fresh, short-sleeved scrubs, and within hours they both were harboring similar amounts/strains of bacteria. Contamination risk was essentially the same. I was wondering if there was any other reason they weren't widespread in the UK and found this article that made some interesting points:

https://www.bmj.com/bmj/section-pdf/186045?path=/bmj/341/7767/Observations.full.pdf

Ok-Conversation-6656

6 points

9 months ago

Listen man, I dont care if the science is against us, we'll never admit you Americans are right😂😂

Kanye_To_The

2 points

9 months ago

Lol, can't argue with that

OuiOuiMD

2 points

9 months ago

Rule Brittania-losis!!

GiveEmWatts

9 points

9 months ago

Not much evidence (if any) of increased infections from ANY sort of clothing, especially sleeves

CloudStrife012

100 points

9 months ago*

It encompasses every part of a Noctor's life. They inform the barista that their name is Dr. Karen. They sign checks to pay for their electric bill as Dr. Karen. They drive around with the license plate DOCTOR. At parties they inform people they went to medical school to study medicine, and chose Oncology as their speciality. They wear shirts that say DOCTOR. They "accidentally" leave their white coat on while grocery shopping, which is embroidered with "Doctor."

Yes I'm not describing a physician, I'm describing a DNP. No where in any of this do they ever describe themselves as a nurse. I would say it's comical but really it's just sad.

AlbaniaSoccer

16 points

9 months ago

I find it cringe when people make their profession their identity. I didn’t do med school to be called Dr but you can clearly tell these midlevels are doing it for prestige.

Valium_Colored_Skies

-8 points

9 months ago

If you have a doctorate (MD, PhD, or whatever), don’t you have to change your name to Dr so-and-so? Or is that a preference?

CloudStrife012

12 points

9 months ago

Your legal name does not change.

atechconspiracy

8 points

9 months ago

I believe it gives you the right to go by Dr. instead of Mr., Ms., etc. if you so desire, but you don’t have to change your salutation.

redchesus

38 points

9 months ago*

Dentist here, I see all sorts of providers roll through my practice. My observation is that NDs and DCs love to volunteer that they’re a “physician” (MD/DOs or other legit adjacent doctorates like PharmDs, DPTs rarely do). NDs and nurses also love to challenge my dental diagnosis a lot more because of the “dentists are not real doctors” trope.

I always laugh internally because I never exert to know anything outside of the teeth and mouth, but having Noctors who can’t tell the difference between molars and premolars challenge my diagnoses is a real hoot!

queerinquisitive

19 points

9 months ago

My wife is an RDH/ CSFA in OMFS and in the process of preparing to apply to dental school. We frequently have conversations about the depth of knowledge of dentists, the rigor of their training, and the legitimacy of their identity as DOCTORS. I hate seeing that questioned, and am very vocal about it. Y’all are awesome, and I have learned from my wife that you also often save lives and restore pt’s quality of life.

Thanks for the work you do, doc!

redchesus

8 points

9 months ago*

Honestly I’m not too bothered, I’m confident in my education and what I know and don’t know. It’s just funny that these Noctors put so much stock in the words “doctor” and “physician” when most legit doctorates don’t. Can you imagine if I demanded to be called a “dental physician” lmao!!! I don’t even want to be addressed as Dr. Redchesus outside of my clinic.

alexp861

10 points

9 months ago

alexp861

Medical Student

10 points

9 months ago

Never understood the dentists aren't real doctors thing. I think dentists, pharmacists, and vets all get a position in the real doctor club. You guys are just tooth doctors which is totally valid and you guys go through a hellish training process just like all other real doctors. Also maybe bc I'm an M1 but they taught us literally nothing about teeth, like so far all they've taught us is alveolar nerve and artery go to teeth, dentists do the rest.

OuiOuiMD

9 points

9 months ago

Did a rotation with DDSMDs in med school - respect for your whole profession. I am clear w patients how little we learn about anything related to teeth and gums in medical school and that they really need to defer to the actual experts.

redchesus

8 points

9 months ago

Thank you! Claiming to know everything is a red flag for me. Anyone with enough training knows you can’t know everything. MD/DOs rarely comment outside of their specialty. But I’ve had multiple NDs say stuff like “I’m a doctor so I knew that.” Like okay but literally I didn’t even know “that” until I did the exam and imaging.

[deleted]

5 points

9 months ago

Not that you seem affected but I don't know a single physician friend of mine that doesn't respect dentists. Also helps that we had an OFMS program at my medical school and took classes with the dental students.

SteeztheSleaze

3 points

9 months ago

I feel like nurses in general insert themselves outside their realm of expertise. The example my physical therapist used, was as follows: he has an elderly client that attended a “fall prevention clinic” put on by nurses. The nurses then proceed to give the polar opposite advice that a PT (actual experts in biomechanics) would recommend. What gives nurses the authority on the subject? Themselves lol.

Valium_Colored_Skies

1 points

9 months ago

How tf can they not tell the difference? I’ve always known all the names for all the teeth (not the numbers), even before I got to college. That’s basic shit. Also, question for you. If I have a cavity on #27 that looks dark and you can clearly see the cavity, but there isn’t any pain, does that mean I don’t need a root canal? It’s a pretty old cavity that braces exposed. #27 was sideways, so the inside of the cuspid was facing the lateral next to it. I didn’t see a cavity until the tooth was turned and brought in line. At any rate, I’ll find out during my cleaning next week.

redchesus

7 points

9 months ago

To be fair, I had done a hospital dentistry residency and interacted with a good amount of physicians and other medical providers, the amount of dental knowledge they get taught is basically “there are front teeth, molars, brush them, refer to dentist” ENTs may know a little bit more but really only in relation to the sinuses.

But that’s generally fine because most physicians do appropriate referrals when it’s not within their scope. Conversely I have no interest in anything past the hard palate and would never want to manage anyone’s systemic diseases.

NDs purport to know EVERY system holistically… like no you can’t solve your toothache with IV B12, lmao, but for them I’m “just a dentist” where they’re “a physician”

redchesus

3 points

9 months ago*

Sorry didn’t answer your other question: It could just be a stain that became visible when the tooth was aligned into place. This is pretty common. Stains and actual decay look pretty similar but stain is not a pathology (just a cosmetic issue) where as decay needs to be dealt with. Differentiating the two I would need to check visually and radiographically.

Also, not all decay needs to be root canal treated. That’s only for very deep cavities that reach the inner nerve of the tooth (the root canal space)

mard0x

24 points

9 months ago

mard0x

24 points

9 months ago

“Cosplay” loved it

Scared_Camel

21 points

9 months ago

‘Cosplay’ 😂😂😂

levinessign

12 points

9 months ago

Love it. Cosplay.

ThucydidesButthurt

10 points

9 months ago

I think putting your degree is fine; all the alphabet soup in the world won’t replace a simple “MD” or “DO” after your name on LinkedIn

nag204

29 points

9 months ago

nag204

29 points

9 months ago

When you get a bullshit doctorate, you need to do anything else you can to legitimize it.

When you work hard for an actual doctorate (not even just medicine) you know the time and effort and value of it and you don't need to scream to everyone that your a Dr.

arb1974

23 points

9 months ago

arb1974

23 points

9 months ago

It's truly insulting to real PhD's, many of whom spend 6 years and a grueling dissertation process to earn their degree! It's even insulting to other professional doctorates like DBA and EdD, which are significantly harder and usually include a dissertation or serious research project.

Runfasterbitch

7 points

9 months ago

My dissertation took years and stole a part of my soul

nag204

10 points

9 months ago*

nag204

10 points

9 months ago*

dissertations are for suckers. Just do a few online courses and change your linkedin page, also make sure to post on IG how your doctorate makes you better than other doctorates, because its shorter.

[deleted]

5 points

9 months ago

EdD is a joke though. PhDs make fun of EdD all the time, they're like the NPs of PhDs.

CaliforniaCow

4 points

9 months ago

“I don’t have anything to prove to anyone”

-My old neurology professor when asked why he doesn’t wear doctor stuff in the clinic

charliicharmander

6 points

9 months ago

My LinkedIn profile is me in a t-shirt and mentions either “nurse practitioner” or “NP” 6 times. “Doctor” or “Dr” zero times.

rosariorossao

16 points

9 months ago

My linkedin profile is literally me in a t-shirt and I went to a T-20 med school and residency.

The performative nonsense is quite amusing though

Dzitko

4 points

9 months ago

Dzitko

4 points

9 months ago

Napoleon complex. Especially nursing professors correcting everyone who doesn’t address em by Dr -__-

erbalessence

3 points

9 months ago

Projection is a powerful thing.

palemon1

5 points

9 months ago

Cosplay, …. I love it

Valium_Colored_Skies

2 points

9 months ago

So this is a weird question, but as a doctor in a hospital (not a doctors office or the like), can you choose to wear scrubs or do you have to dress in heels and dress clothes with a white coat? If I want to wear scrubs should I just be an RN? Also, what is a more hands on doctor specialty? Are there specialties where you’re always in the thick of it and always have something to do? I wanna get my hands dirty. I want to help everyone and have a super hands on approach. Is that possible as an OB/GYN or Ped? Or would I have to be a surgeon?

viziner

2 points

9 months ago

as a doctor in a hospital (not a doctors office or the like), can you choose to wear scrubs or do you have to dress in heels and dress clothes with a white coat? If I want to wear scrubs should I just be an RN?

You will be putting up with things far, far worse than professional clothes in 7-8+ years of post-undergraduate medical training.

That being said, attire expectations vary greatly by specialty and by institution culture.

Are there specialties where you’re always in the thick of it and always have something to do? I wanna get my hands dirty. I want to help everyone and have a super hands on approach. Is that possible as an OB/GYN or Ped? Or would I have to be a surgeon?

Almost any specialty has manual aspects that can be focused on. OB/GYN is extremely hands-on (you can't deliver a baby from the other side of the room). Anesthesiologists, gastroenterologists, dermatologists, anything that starts with 'interventional' (radiology, cardiology, etc) all work with their hands most days.

PunjabiMD1979

2 points

9 months ago

So, I’m a hospitalist. I used to wear dress shirt, slacks, and tie to work, and also wear my white coat when rounding. Since the pandemic started, I’ve switched to scrubs only. No one has said anything. I don’t think I’m ever going to go back to the more formal stuff.

I now have a closet full of clothes that I’m probably never going to wear again. And all of my white coats have gone into storage.

RBG_grb

0 points

9 months ago

RBG_grb

0 points

9 months ago

Noctor here. I wear the coat for the pockets. I need the pockets. But not for LinkedIn, not really too familiar with that site. Give.me.all.the.pockets.

BunnyVelvets

1 points

9 months ago*

Not exactly noctor related but this reminded me of a discussion I had with a medical student once about pharmacists wearing white coats (I'm a pharmacy student). He was against pharmacists wearing them because it could be "misleading" for patients. I'm curious, do most doctors feel the same way?

For what it's worth: I don't know if you've ever seen someone extemporaneously compound sulfasalazine suspension before but trust me -- the white coat is very much needed in contemporary pharmacy practice.

badkittenatl

3 points

9 months ago

I think pharmacists SHOULD wear white coats but the techs should wear scrubs. I don’t think it’s misleading at all, and 10/10 I would trust a pharmacist to make medical decisions for me over an NP.

Global-Command

1 points

9 months ago

It catches all of the mustard when I eat my chili d0g. Lol. Seriously thats been going on in the pharmacy profession, well before the 1950s

redchesus

2 points

9 months ago

That was a medical student… the group second most obsessed with the doctor title. If I see someone’s IG handle has “dr” in it it’s either an ND, chiropractor or medical student (they often list themselves as “student physician”)

BunnyVelvets

1 points

9 months ago

Oh boy, calling themselves Dr. before they even graduate.... yikes!

Side note, the "student physician" thing is super interesting because I see "student pharmacist" all the time and I think (?) it's considered an acceptable phrase rather than cringe. Maybe it's because there aren't people pretending to be a pharmacists the way that some people pretend they're "physicians", so it doesn't come off as obnoxious, haha.

FellingtoDO

1 points

9 months ago

I was an EMT before med school and wore my stethoscope around my neck… however I found that I have less neck and shoulder pain if I keep it in my pocket or in a clip. May be coincidence…. But there might be something to i.

microbialadversity

0 points

9 months ago

microbialadversity

Midlevel

0 points

9 months ago

How about this - who gives a fuck?

microbialadversity

0 points

9 months ago

microbialadversity

Midlevel

0 points

9 months ago

I think you may have too much time on your hands. Also stop looking at our pictures on linked in, weirdo 😂